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Br1ck

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Like everyone else, I've been spending more time online, most recently on the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum. A lot of the discussions over there seem to center on how much people are willing to spend on the latest ultra spendy authentics, and the investment potential (LOL) of the latest artist endorsement model. A typical question is if it's worth it to jump to the Authentic line over just a plain old regular one.

Here, there seem to be many more questions related to value. I guess it comes down to less interest in Guilds among wealthier people, like most consumer goods, people who can tend to seek not only performance but exclusivety. A new D 55 is ,in the scheme of things, a pretty affordable guitar. The last one I played was for me a far better guitar than any Martins I played that day. I was playing my Guild D 35 yesterday, I have a Martin D 35 too, And for certain things, it works better than my other dreads. Certain my bang for buck champion. Is there a better acoustic guitar value than an old D 25? My personal desire in a guitar starts with old wood at the top of the list. This often comes with cosmetic issues which are of no concern to me.

I once had an acquaintance who inherited a dozen piles of money who only wanted new, shiny, and expensive. He could afford easily a pre war Martin, or four or five, but bought stuff like a Martin dread with special metallic paint that changed color. What a waste. Anyway, I enjoy the looking for an early D 25 threads. Or better yet, finding one.
 

fronobulax

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My observations has always been that people know Guilds are made to be played. If anyone has shelled out more than $5,000 for a Guild, I don't recall that they posted about it. People who cannot even spell "acoustic guitar" have heard about Martin and Gibson. People who know about Guild typically are looking for something not as mainstream (I bought my first Guild bass because it wasn't a fender, for example) or have enough expereince to recognize value of "bang for the buck". Interesting insight. Thanks.
 

chazmo

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I think "value" has a wildly varying and different meaning for Martin owners than it does for Guild owners. Certainly, the definition of what's collectible or not varies too. Taylor also factors into this equation with different fundamentals regarding value and collectibility.

Anyway, to love the Guild brand you have to love the underdog, at least in the US-built guitar world. And, of course, you're among Guild lovers here (though not exclusively), so most of us appreciate what makes a Guild great.
 

Rayk

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Interesting , I never thought of Guild as a underdog . I am king of cheap . My Blueridge 180A is a Martin killer ( they use that term with cell phones called flagship killers do why not with guitars ) Lol

I Will admit you guys have Nerd'd me out about Guilds and I think they are amazing when you find the right one/ones . Lol

Guild will always be in my heart so I guess I need to buy more of them . Lol
 

Badger

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Blueridge me to (Br70). 😉
I find that Guild's only defect is the heaviness and very rigid reinforcements of the top. I love light guitars but it's a psychological problem, not a real one. Today Guild oxnards are lightened. Time will tell us which ones are better.
 

beecee

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My personal desire in a guitar starts with old wood at the top of the list. This often comes with cosmetic issues which are of no concern to me.

Been my feelings as well!

Anyway, to love the Guild brand you have to love the underdog, at least in the US-built guitar world.

Always equated Guild to the Chrysler of the big 3.

I am king of cheap .

I'm the king of one downmanship. My D-40 will crush your Martin "X" and my 95 Toyota T-100 will haul more sheetrock or demo debris than your $50,000 king cab short box "pickup"

 

Tom O

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My "new" 2002 Corona D-40 sounded better than any of the Martins I played in the same store. It was my first Guild and marked down in 2006. Maybe the Fender decal on the back of the headstock scared buyers off. It is heavier than my old Gibson. Funny thing, someone else bought a new Martin at the same time and wanted the action lowered to match my Guild. It sounds even better today.
 

GAD

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My observations has always been that people know Guilds are made to be played. If anyone has shelled out more than $5,000 for a Guild, I don't recall that they posted about it. People who cannot even spell "acoustic guitar" have heard about Martin and Gibson. People who know about Guild typically are looking for something not as mainstream (I bought my first Guild bass because it wasn't a fender, for example) or have enough expereince to recognize value of "bang for the buck". Interesting insight. Thanks.
I've considered a few Guilds over $5k but they tend to be very rare or one of a kind.
 

Br1ck

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Blueridge me to (Br70). 😉
I find that Guild's only defect is the heaviness and very rigid reinforcements of the top. I love light guitars but it's a psychological problem, not a real one. Today Guild oxnards are lightened. Time will tell us which ones are better.
Find a Hoboken or early 70s Guild and you will find a lightweight guitar. The flip side is it will most probably have had a neck reset (mine) or needs one. I'm amazed whenever I pick up a 78 or 80 at how heavy it is. They had to do that for their own protection as folks just did not know how to take care of their guitars.

Guilds were popular with college kids in the early 70s because they were two week's worth of groceries cheaper than a Martin D 18.
 

adorshki

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My "new" 2002 Corona D-40 sounded better than any of the Martins I played in the same store. It was my first Guild and marked down in 2006. Maybe the Fender decal on the back of the headstock scared buyers off. It is heavier than my old Gibson. Funny thing, someone else bought a new Martin at the same time and wanted the action lowered to match my Guild. It sounds even better today.
So does my '03. Took the longest of all 3 to start opening up (think it must be something about the way thy built 'em there, it was a return to the "built like a tank" era, at least going by our 2 and some other reports) but boy it was worth the wait.
 

adorshki

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Find a Hoboken or early 70s Guild and you will find a lightweight guitar. The flip side is it will most probably have had a neck reset (mine) or needs one. I'm amazed whenever I pick up a 78 or 80 at how heavy it is. They had to do that for their own protection as folks just did not know how to take care of their guitars.
It was also suggested once by respected member Cap'n Juan (Gone but not Forgotten) that it was a way of helping to ensure a lower rate of warranty claims.
EDIT: Speak of coincidence, I see this was confirmed by member Wiley Pickett over here in post #3:
 
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Cougar

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My "new" 2002 Corona D-40... was my first Guild... It is heavier than my old Gibson.... It sounds even better today.
So does my '03.... it was a return to the "built like a tank" era....
Yeah, my 2002 JF30-12 was also my first Guild. If you guys' D40s are considered tanks, my JF30-12 is an M1A1 Abrams. 🇺🇲😁
 

Ghostwheel

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I play a '91 D-25NT. Play mostly by myself. Haven't really tinkered with anyone else's guitar and haven't gone into any music stores to play around for many, many years. Went into a Guitar Center a few months ago to see if I could try the much vaunted Martin D-18. They only had one, a used 80's model, overpriced (I saw later when looking it up online) at around $2K. It wouldn't be fair to comment on the sound since they had that acoustic room feeling like a tropical rain forest and the strings were literally rusting (good lord people, if you're going to try to get $2K for a guitar, at least change the strings now and then - it sounded like a toy)...but the thing that sprang out at me was that when I went to pick it up I almost threw it though the ceiling! Soooo light. I'd like to give it a chance under better circumstances, but one thing's for sure my D-25 is really like a tank compared to that thing.
 

Ghostwheel

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Actually, knowing there are a lot of 12 string D-25's out there, I've been wondering if the 6 string and 12 string versions are the same on the inside, and that maybe the 6 strings are heavier than average because they're braced the same as a 12 string for the extra tension? Just wondering.
 

Brucebubs

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I like to contribute on a couple other guitar forums and I gotta say Guild jumbo 12-strings have a long standing and well deserved reputation among other brands.
 

GGJaguar

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A lot of the discussions over there seem to center on how much people are willing to spend on the latest ultra spendy authentics, and the investment potential (LOL) of the latest artist endorsement model. A typical question is if it's worth it to jump to the Authentic line over just a plain old regular one.
Player-Collectors and investors have a different perspective than a "regular" guitar player. Nothing wrong with that. It's just a different thing.


Here, there seem to be many more questions related to value. I guess it comes down to less interest in Guilds among wealthier people, like most consumer goods, people who can tend to seek not only performance but exclusivety.
Evaluating an acoustic guitar based on bang-for-the-buck is one criterion, but ultimately, shouldn't it be evaluated (and chosen) based on if it has the right sound for the player? I have always loved Guild acoustics, but they don't have "my sound". Martin 12-fret dreadnaughts have the sound I prefer so that's what I play. Not because they are Martins, just because they have that sound.
 
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