How many of you have an S300 or other model with the same shaped body?

DrumBob

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OP, the S series guitars were very controversial when I worked for Guild, in fact, there were times we had overstock in the warehouse and I was told to blow them out at 50%+15 to dealers. It was a hard sale even at those bargain basement prices. All our salespeople were begging for a conventional solidbody they could sell, so we reissued the M-80 in a slightly different body shape.

When the S series guitars were new, dealers eagerly stocked them, but when they sat on the wall for six to twelve months or longer, they got turned off and many refused to stock them anymore.
 

S100

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She’s a looker: 3B56A45B-DE69-489C-9C6C-73EEA8B899E8.jpeg
 

3bolt79

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OP, the S series guitars were very controversial when I worked for Guild, in fact, there were times we had overstock in the warehouse and I was told to blow them out at 50%+15 to dealers. It was a hard sale even at those bargain basement prices. All our salespeople were begging for a conventional solidbody they could sell, so we reissued the M-80 in a slightly different body shape.

When the S series guitars were new, dealers eagerly stocked them, but when they sat on the wall for six to twelve months or longer, they got turned off and many refused to stock them anymore.

Whose brainchild was the design? It seems to me that the design was very futuristic for its day. It was always a bucket list guitar for me, since I was a kid. I couldn’t believe, when I tried it, that it sat so well playing sitting down. I will never find one as inexpensive as I found mine, which was $595.00 with original case, 2 years ago. I had to find a missing saddle, a neck pickup ring, and do some light restoration on it. The strap buttons are eve original. Why did they go with the nailed on design by the way?
 

DrumBob

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Whose brainchild was the design? It seems to me that the design was very futuristic for its day. It was always a bucket list guitar for me, since I was a kid. I couldn’t believe, when I tried it, that it sat so well playing sitting down. I will never find one as inexpensive as I found mine, which was $595.00 with original case, 2 years ago. I had to find a missing saddle, a neck pickup ring, and do some light restoration on it. The strap buttons are eve original. Why did they go with the nailed on design by the way?

The S guitars were a reworking of a guitar made by the Hoyer company of Germany, a guitar that was never really marketed in the USA. I can't answer you as to why they nailed on the strap buttons, but I don't believe they did. I think yours were nailed on by a previous owner. I could be wrong in your case though.
 

3bolt79

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I was told by another former Guild employee that the bottom strap buttons were all nailed on on the S300’s. The top strap button was screwed in. That was Theguitarmechanic. He sells old Guild parts.
 

SFIV1967

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I was told by another former Guild employee that the bottom strap buttons were all nailed on on the S300’s. The top strap button was screwed in.
They weren’t nailed on - they’re press fit. I’ve had more than one fall out over the years.
Those are the two strap buttons, as you can see on @Knash 's webpage, the small one mounted traditionally with a screw to the horn and the large tapered one just press fit like on any acoustic guitar:

1634294109040.png

Ralf
 

Nuuska

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Those are the two strap buttons, as you can see on @Knash 's webpage, the small one mounted traditionally with a screw to the horn and the large tapered one just press fit like on any acoustic guitar:

View attachment 26284

Ralf

If that press-fit button had a hole through it - a thin screw would keep it from falling. That would be the best solution on solid body guitar. My Schecter Strat has a broken screw that is next to impossible to remove - at horn. I bought a set of hollow drills - only to misplace them before I got to work. 😂

So now - instead of having a kaputt guitar - I have a kaputt guitar + lost set of tools 😏
 

GAD

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If that press-fit button had a hole through it - a thin screw would keep it from falling. That would be the best solution on solid body guitar. My Schecter Strat has a broken screw that is next to impossible to remove - at horn. I bought a set of hollow drills - only to misplace them before I got to work. 😂

So now - instead of having a kaputt guitar - I have a kaputt guitar + lost set of tools 😏

After almost smashing my beloved S300AD in the '80s, I plugged the hole with a dowel and put in a proper strap-lock.
 

SFIV1967

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If that press-fit button had a hole through it - a thin screw would keep it from falling.
Well at least at some point Guild started using the much better type as used in the Bluesbird:

1634399961561.jpeg 1634400034673.jpeg

Which I "redesigned" on my Bluesbird for use with a Schaller strap lock:

1634400242930.png

1634400389931.png 1634400478379.png

Ralf
 
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