Saddles size for a 1963 Guild Mark IV

Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Does anyone have a recommended saddle for it?

I have a 1963 Mark IV that's been around the block. It's been stored for awhile but now with all the free time we all seem to have I dug her out. (yes she was humidity and temperature controlled, I'm not an animal)

Somewhere in her journey she lost her saddle. Does anyone have a recommended saddle? I seem to remember it having a slanted B string style saddle but I've had to many guitars over the years and can't swear to it.

I can measure the length and width easy enough but the height is critical as well and I have no idea. Searches on the internet and a request to Guild directly have given no real help.

Any help would be very appreciated.
 

gjmalcyon

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
2,464
Reaction score
91
Welcome - stick around. Nice bunch of folks around here. Much love for vintage Marks in this community. Someone will be along shortly - just wanted to say welcome.
 
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Thanks. I've been here many times over the years as a browser but now seemed the time to join and ask a question I figured this forum could help with....I appreciate the welcoming to the group.
 

geoguy

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2009
Messages
1,987
Reaction score
62
Welcome . . . I expect that you'll need to start with a saddle that is too tall, & sand the bottom of the new saddle until you get the string height that you want.

I don't own a Guild classical guitar, but would not have expected a compensated saddle. Just looked at a couple of photos on-line, & they all (well, both) appear to show a straight saddle. Like this one:

 
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Thanks. I guess the one it came with (12 or so years ago when I bought it) was not standard now that I look at pictures and they are all straight and not slanted on the B string. I think I will go with a 3 inch by 3/32 flat saddle since the neck is flat and not round like my Strats. The question remaining now is ivory or bone....trying to keep it as original as I can. What's the preference among the pros for saddle composition? I feel like bone is the rights choice, but I'm open to suggestions. Thanks for all the help.
 

GardMan

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
4,726
Reaction score
62
Conservation ethics and politics aside, and I am certainly no expert, but I don't believe you can traffic elephant ivory across international or state lines (within the US)... making it hard to procure and risking confiscation of your instrument if it is found in violation...

To avoid that risk, I would suggest you stick with bone...
 

silverfox103

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2010
Messages
1,368
Reaction score
9
I have two Mark IV's of that era, a 64 and a 66. I'll get out the digital micrometer in the AM.

I had Bob Colossi make several over the years, if I still have the original, I can send it to you. You can send it to him and have him make you one and return mine when done. Not 100% sure which guitars I have had them done, in the morning.

Tom
 
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Gardman - Thanks....I didn't even think of that, although there are lots of places that claim they can ship Ivory, better safe than sorry.

SilverFox103 - I'd love that. Let me know how to coordinate with you.
 

kakerlak

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2009
Messages
2,172
Reaction score
48
I think some folks are using fossilized ivory these days -- that might be an option. Honestly, you guys might chew me up for this, but I never really thought saddle material made that great a difference in tone. I think anything reasonably hard will sound about the same, so long as it's well-fitted to the instrument. To that end, I know some folks will slightly compensate a classical guitar saddle, by filing its crown slightly ahead/behind the centerline from string to string.
 
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Kinda my thought on the saddle composition...I agree on the ridged saddle...and since this old girl has almost 60 years of wear and she's pretty beaten up. I'm just looking to keep her sounding bright and clean with no buzz or humm. I'm open to replacing the nut end as well if it makes sense. I'm just a fan of keeping a classic alive...nothing beats the sound of a weathered instrument.

This forum is amazing. I applaud you all for your input.
 

silverfox103

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2010
Messages
1,368
Reaction score
9
Hi Jay

I didn't have an extra saddle as I thought. Here are the measurements I came up with: Low E 4.90 mm and tapers down to 4.31 on the high E. I think you'll have to buy some bone blanks on ebay or Stewie Mac and fit them to what you feel is right for you. I like the strings as low as can be without buzzing, that may not be what you like. My guitars aren't the exact year of yours, so there may be a difference there also.

Just get a piece of relatively fine sandpaper and go at it. It doesn't take long.

Good Luck

Tom
 
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Thanks. I ordered a couple saddles from Stewie Mac with enough room to get them right. I've done the sanding down many times before so I think I'll find something that works. Thanks for the measurements. I am the same way. I like the strings as low as they can go without buzz but I'm used to wound and metal strings on acoustics and electrics. This is my only nylon guitar so it should be a fun experiment. I bought a few sets of strings to so I can find the happy place.

Thanks for all the help.
 
Top