Okay, everybody calm down

walrus

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I think the answer is "NOOOOOO!"...

walrus
 

JohnW63

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I hope someone with a Facebook account tells them no. Still, the post is in the "P90" discussion group, so I doubt any will.
 

AcornHouse

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I hope someone with a Facebook account tells them no. Still, the post is in the "P90" discussion group, so I doubt any will.
I joined the group. Pretty much everyone is shouting “NO!” at him.
 

GAD

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Hang on... where's my pitchfork?
 

Walter Broes

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Tell him I'll trade him an Epiphone "wildkat" or whatever for it. I'll even throw in a case.
 

txbumper57

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I don't facebook but if I did I would offer him an Excellent condition Starfire III-P90 in trade so he wouldn't cut up the 60 model. The the 60 model would be in safe hands.:playful: That is if he is located in the States so we don't have to go through all the CITES BS.

TX
 
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Guildedagain

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P90's can sound ok sometimes (heavily overdriven slide guitar) but don't warrant any kind of guitar butchery, unless you're taking one out ;-)

On my only axe from the mid 80's to the mid 90's, a '65 SG JR., the shrill tone and hum had me yanking it out for a Duncan Distortion and it stayed that way until I changed it back to sell/trade it.
 

txbumper57

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The cool thing about the Starfire III-90 is that Guild used Duncan Antiquities P90's which have more of a vintage tone than the modern P90's do. They can get plenty nasty and syrupy if you want them too but they also have a wonderful Fat clean tone to them without a lot of the 60 cycle hum. Not all P90's are made or sound the same. The Phat Staple pickups that Duncan makes also have the vintage qualities to them as they are modeled after the original 50's Gibson Staple pickups but they are pretty quiet at idle too. I have a few sets of them in different guitars as well and they sound closer to a Dynasonic with P90 qualities than a full on Modern P90. It all depends on what tone you are after.

TX
 

GAD

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P90's can sound ok sometimes (heavily overdriven slide guitar) but don't warrant any kind of guitar butchery, unless you're taking one out ;-)

On my only axe from the mid 80's to the mid 90's, a '65 SG JR., the shrill tone and hum had me yanking it out for a Duncan Distortion and it stayed that way until I changed it back to sell/trade it.
If you had shrill tone that you had terribly P90s. P90s have produced some of the most iconic tones in rock, and good ones are amazing. Bad ones, though, can suck in a big way.

My Fender Custom Shop Bluebird-P90 had some awful P90s in it and I swapped them for Antiquities which are incredible.
 
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My rule is never mod something vintage that cannot be reversed without damage or leaving a mark! Buy a different guitar if you have to....
 

parker_knoll

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I don't facebook but if I did I would offer him an Excellent condition Starfire III-P90 in trade so he wouldn't cut up the 60 model. The the 60 model would be in safe hands.:playful: That is if he is located in the States so we don't have to go through all the CITES BS.

TX
I already did that :)

Although the SFIII-90, despite being worth less, is possibly a rarer animal
 

txbumper57

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I already did that :)

Although the SFIII-90, despite being worth less, is possibly a rarer animal
Cool, Honestly even though an early Starfire III would be nice and that looks like a nice example, I would hate to get rid of my SFIII-90. One of my Favorite electrics of all time.

TX
 

Guildedagain

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If you had shrill tone that you had terribly P90s.
Quite possibly there wasn't anything terrible about the original P90 in my SG. It just didn't have what I needed to play hard rock, more AC/DC than Mountain ;-)

This is back in the day when an SG Jr. didn't have any collectibility and just about just got you laughed at... a lot of other guys with similar guitar LP Jr's and Specials not only had gnarly humbuckers in them but also Khalers just to keep up with the times, play Eruption, etc...

I've never been able to like P90's like some people can, it's a freq resonance thing.

I'm kind of a devotee of the LP standard into a Marshall JMP sound, a sound that very much requires a PAF maybe because of this.


"The resonant frequency of most available pickups in combination with normal guitar cables lies between 2,000 and 5,000 Hz. This is the range where the human ear has its highest sensitivity. A quick subjective correlation of frequency to sound is that at 2,000 Hz the sound is warm and mellow, at 3,000 Hz brilliant or present, at 4,000 Hz piercing, and at 5,000 Hz or more brittle and thin. The sound also depends on the height of the peak, of course. A high peak produces a powerful, characteristic sound; a low peak produces a weaker sound, especially with solid body guitars that have no acoustic body resonance. The height of the peak of most available pickups ranges between 1 and 4 (0 to 12 dB), it is dependent on the magnetic material in the coil, on the external resistive load , and on the metal case (without casing it is higher; many guitarists prefer this). The resonant frequency depends on both the inductance L (with most available pickups, between 1 and 10 Henries) and the capacitance C. C is the sum of the winding capacitance of the coil (usually about 80 - 200 pF) and the cable capacitance (about 300 - 1,000 pF). Since different guitar cables have different amounts of capacitance, it is clear that using different guitar cables with an unbuffered pickup will change the resonant frequency and hence the overall sound.

Up to this point, it has not taken into account the influence of eddy currents in metal parts. Such currents appear wherever an alternating magnetic field flows through electrically conductive parts. These parts are mostly the cores of magnetic coils – that is, either permanent magnets (in which the currents are relatively weak) or soft iron parts such as screws or fixed slugs (where the currents are stronger). Strong eddy currents can also occur in metal covers; these currents vanish when the covers are removed."
 

GAD

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None of the science matters when I'm copping that Aqualung tone. :playful:
 
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Cool, Honestly even though an early Starfire III would be nice and that looks like a nice example, I would hate to get rid of my SFIII-90. One of my Favorite electrics of all time.

TX

SFIII-90 been on my list for a while, but pretty hard to find.
 
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