How I lost 1,000 lbs.

beecee

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ADK-LMG???.
I’m game. Love it up there, but it had better be soon!
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True....it tends to get cold up there early, but if there is interest I think it would be great but the reality is with all the Covid issues and the like, this may be better shelved until next year.

Hey, free lodging....only have a small galley kitchen but dueling chefs could make the food as memorable as the music.

A bit of a hike as it is West of Tupper Lake...great drive up, long drive home. Wouldn't be restricted to a Friday-Sunday either....I'd be up for the entire week prior. 2 private rooms for couples....the rest camp style. Roll in as early as you'd like, (except the early birds may be forced into some minor forced labor).

I've not looked into how much juice a guitar amp pulls...might be ok during the day but this may be an acoustic only event.

oh Gawd...I'm already thinking of a spot I can build an appropriately ADK looking outdoors platform/stage that would double as a great 2 tier seating area on the north end ..kinda like re using the Olympic venues after the games.

Alright I gotta get some sleep
 

Opsimath

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Absolutely beautiful home, even though you call it a "camp". They disassembled and moved that beauty "as a joke"?! Wow, did they ever have time on their hands. I wonder how long it took, and any idea when they did that?
 

beecee

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It was placed there around 1910 +/-. I have a postcard dated 1920 showing it there.

Local lore says it came from Wanakena after Rich Lumber left the area. They did leave a number of somewhat smaller houses in place, but this was supposedly the mill Mgrs house which they would disassemble and move to the next lucky area they set up shop.

That was child's play back then compared to what they did on a daily basis:

The Fox brothers of Warren County were the first to float logs downstream to mills; previously, sawmills were moved around where cutting occurred. Finished lumber was then combined into rafts and floated downstream to markets, a method of transportation that continued until the 1880s. Defebaugh described the construction of a raft:

The pine and hemlock were laid from 24 to 30 courses deep, several courses projecting above the surface of the water. Each course was laid at right angles to the preceding one, and this served to hold the lumber together. As most of the lumber was in 16-foot lengths, the lumber squares thus formed measured 16 feet on each edge. These were made into a raft. The customary size of a raft was 148 feet in width and 160 feet long. A raft of this size, containing 25 courses, would include 180,000 feet of lumber or more.


Heck, moving that house was probably done during a coffee break!

 
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