Battery tech leap

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The local boys and girls at Drexel have discovered a way to make rechargable batteries lighter and increase the number of times you can recharge them. This will also reduce the cost, and put us on the road to eliminating most, if not all of the toxic metals used in making batteries.

 

GGJaguar

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The battery companies aren't going to like that (in the long run).
 

lungimsam

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It’s amazing that the oil lobby could not put a stop to all electric/hybrid vehicles.
My friend developed batteries for the army and said battery tech is very dangerous and toxic. He said White Oak, MD was a dumping ground for toxic waste back in the day behind the labs there. I don’t believe this new form will be any safer or less toxic or less exploitive of human labor/living environs. Won’t the mining still continue?
 
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fronobulax

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It’s amazing that the oil lobby could not put a stop to all electric/hybrid vehicles.
My friend developed batteries for the army and said battery tech is very dangerous and toxic. He said White Oak, MD was a dumping ground for toxic waste back in the day behind the labs there. I don’t believe this new form will be any safer or less toxic or less exploitive of human labor/living environs. Won’t the mining still continue?


From the article

Replacing the cathode in Li-ion batteries with a sulfur one would alleviate the need for sourcing cobalt, nickel and manganese.

Presumably Lithium is still needed so the new technology does not effect Lithium mining. But it does seem as if the demand for mining cobalt, nickel and manganese would be reduced.
 

beecee

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I'm using 6-24 Volt NCA\NMC batteries from wrecked Chevy Volts. There are two 24 volt modules per car...more 48 and 72...only 2 x 24.

I love watching the progress of tech improvement. I have 60% more capacity for roughly the weight of one of my FLA's...and I had to use eight of those.

I'd prefer LiFePo but at this rate I may just wait a bit longer.

Not sure big oil can stop GM, Mercedes, Audi, Hyundai/Kia et al. That ship has sailed. When they make a reasonably priced EV with 500+ mile range I'm in.

And I'm an old car nut!!!!
 

Midnight Toker

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It’s amazing that the oil lobby could not put a stop to all electric/hybrid vehicles.
Oh I think they did a very fine job of squashing them. A hundred years worth!

"In 1900, 28% of all the cars (4,192) made in the US were electric." :geek:

 

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What's going to power all these EVs?

The "oil lobby" sounds a little too "political ", for lack of a better word. It is debatable on who is more dangerous to your way of life, the "oil lobby" or the "green lobby".

Reading that article, it looks like the consumer crushed electric cars.
 

twocorgis

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What's going to power all these EVs?

The "oil lobby" sounds a little too "political ", for lack of a better word. It is debatable on who is more dangerous to your way of life, the "oil lobby" or the "green lobby".

Reading that article, it looks like the consumer crushed electric cars.
Electric cars are here to stay, whether you like them or not.

Personally, I like manual transmissions, and electric cars don't even have transmissions, so I'll likely stay with ICEs for the foreseeable future. But the march is inexorable. Cadillac, for one, is not introducing any more new ICE lines, and it has plenty of company.
 

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I remember when I was a kid...
The stink of exhaust fumes everywhere from out of tune carbonators and no pollution controls. Cars have gotten remarkably less obnoxious to be around in that sense. Change happens, and there are benefits that a subtle enough that most people miss them, unless they are actively looking for them.
One of those subtle things will be how much quieter the world around you will be. Not so much in the rural environment, where the level of noise pollution is pretty low, but in more developed areas. That's a good thing. It'll go completely under the radar, unless you watch an old movie.

As far as range and cold weather performance of EVs, power grid requirements and all that other stuff, it will all change. Nothing remains at the same level of development for the rest of time, unless you point to niche applications, like vacuum tubes. And to fill that niche market, that product will become more expensive, like premium leaded gasoline. I remember when you couldn't give away a Plymouth Roadrunner. You had to be an amateur chemist to keep the valves from sticking, and octane booster to keep the knocking from banging holes in the cylinders. Same thing

To circle back to the article, the same amount of charge at a third the cost and weight. Figure, a new Ford Lightning pickup is rated at 400 miles without a recharge - so consider, using new battery tech would make the truck either 2000 pounds lighter, or, if they go the other way and retain battery size and weight, a Lightning with a 1200 mile range, hypothetically.
Things change, usually in a positive way. After all, I don't have a bin of corncobs next to the toilet. Those things are hell on the plumbing. 😐
 

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davismanLV

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It's funny because I know people who live in places where a Tesla is never seen. (Regardless of if you like them or not) Yet Las Vegas is Tesla town!! Within moments of my house are 10 charging stations for Teslas all over the place. I'd conservatively estimate the amount of Tesla Uber/Lyft drivers at 35% here. They're quiet and the cost of operation is insanely low. This past two weeks I've ridden in at least 10 of them. So while many may dislike them/him, they've really paved the way for what's to come.
 

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Where does Las Vegas get their electricity?

EVs might work as a short distance taxi, but how does everything that makes that city work get there? Food, people, everything, even Teslas? Probably on a method of conveyance powered by something other than electricity.
 
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Nuuska

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Hello

In summertime my EV consumes about 7-9kWh/100km while diriving in town - 1 liter of gasoline has 9kWh energy - that makes it roughly 250 miles per gallon of fuel.

So rathter than burning most of the fuel into heat - especially in hot climate - what about producing electricity to power EV:s ?

Wintertime in Finland - having spikes on wheels, snow on roads, heating etc about doubles the consumption. Still far better efficiency than w petrol cars.

I fully agree that for those who need to drive 2-300 miles daily w no or poor charging stations the good old petrol or diesel is best choice - but there are millions and milions of people who live in a house where they can charge the car every night and their daily travel is not that much.

Next month 18 will mark 3rd year of my e-car driving - there's no turning back - for me that is . . . I fully understand that it is not for everyone - your mileage and needs do vary - I realize that.
 

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Let's see...
Anheuser Busch has had hydrogen electric trucks for several years. Eventually, there will probably be hybrid versions. Electric motors have torque in spades, so maybe there are multi gear transmissions there. Maybe train-like diesel electrics. Having a small steady-state diesel running only a generator would have very low emissions. Who can guess how they will figure out the solutions, but there will be solutions.
 

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But this battery development isn't a electric vehicle only thing. Think of the phones, laptops, rechargeable stuff of every kind. That's a lot of reduced toxins into the environment, and less cost to make.
 

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I know I've posted this berore but here is my former off grid solar battery bank: over 1,000 lbs of lead and acid.... 8 x 6 volt 330 amp hour and lots of maintenance for 24 volt system inverted to 110. About 15 kwh of which you can only realistically use 20%

1674802445662.png

4 Chevy Volt Cells @ 100lbs total....and more usable storage capacity: I'm now up to six cells with almost 6 kwh of power, and you can discharge up to 80%, to run 35+ lights and 5 ceiling fans for several days of no sun...of which there is really no such thing. And they rechrge 100% by mid morning!!!!

1674802737706.png

Wish I could rotate picture!÷
 
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