Why doesn't Guild offer the D25 any more?

GGJaguar

Venerated Member
Gold Supporting
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
10,461
Reaction score
12,091
Location
Skylands
Guild Total
40
Because in their mind, the D-20 they currently make is close enough and probably sells well.
 

jeffcoop

Senior Member
Gold Supporting
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,480
Reaction score
169
I guess the broader question, then, is: why hasn't Guild offered the arch-back D25 since the Westerly days? My D25 served not only as my introduction to USA-made acoustic guitars (my previous guitar was a Yamaha) but also as the gateway drug to the world of Guild.

I guess the D20 is meant to be today's gateway drug.
 

chazmo

Super Moderator
Gold Supporting
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
19,849
Reaction score
2,723
Location
Central Massachusetts
I’d guess they don’t want to cut into their sales of their overseas arch backs:
This is a little sideways because prior to the takeover of Guild by Cordoba the GAD (i.e., MIC) versions of the D-25 were all solid mahogany -- tops and not arch-backs, that is. Indeed, now the Westerly Series "200" guitars are arch-backs, and I guess a D-240 is the closest thing to the older D-25 in the line-up.

Having said all that, don't dismiss the all-solid GADs/100-series D-25 versions... Those were really excellent guitars and sounded great. Don't get me wrong, the arch-back D-25s of yore are wonderful too, but I really liked those MIC solid-backed versions. I haven't played a Westerly Series D-240 for comparison...
 

chazmo

Super Moderator
Gold Supporting
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
19,849
Reaction score
2,723
Location
Central Massachusetts
Yes, but couldn't that be said of any model?
Not necessarily, Marc. We can't really know this without hearing from Cordoba on the reasons behind it.

My take on what was happening in New Hartford is that they mostly limited themselves to making premium models that they could justify higher-than-import prices for. The one major exception to that rule was the Standard Series where you were able to get all the goodies of a body style with reduced cost.

CMG seems to be on a different path. I think Cordoba has been quite creative about what they've built in Oxnard vs. imported from Asia... They've experimented with some reduced-cost production techniques, some of which have been OK, maybe not so much others. But, they brought in "lower" models (I don't feel that way about them, just saying...) and invented some new model names to cut their teeth. I mean New Hartford started with the D-55! CMG went a different way.

Anyway, it's fascinating stuff. I wish we had some solid answers to these questions, but really all we're doing is guessing.
 

chazmo

Super Moderator
Gold Supporting
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
19,849
Reaction score
2,723
Location
Central Massachusetts
Isn’t the arched press in Oxnard?
Yes it is. Whatever they're doing in Asia is newer equipment, Woody. Maybe they got some production stuff from Ensenada, where the Arcos series was built years ago, but I doubt it. I think that was a Fender facility (not that that's conclusive).
 

HeyMikey

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2018
Messages
3,529
Reaction score
2,546
Location
MA
Guild Total
9
I thought there was a limited run D25 listed recently on Reverb at about $2700. For that price I’d just stick to finding a good vintage one.
 
Last edited:

jeffcoop

Senior Member
Gold Supporting
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,480
Reaction score
169
I thought there was a limited run D25 listed recently on Reverb at about $2700. For that price I’d just stick to finding a good vintage one.
That GSR D25E looks typical of Cordoba's GSR guitars: a fairly standard guitar (in this case a D20) with a special California burst and a couple of other changes to appointments (and in this case to model name), at a higher price. The promotional materials state that it is based on the first iteration of the D25, so all mahogany and flat back.
 

Br1ck

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2014
Messages
1,247
Reaction score
857
Location
San Jose, Ca
I suspect that most of the market for a domestically produced and priced, arch back D25, are members of Let's Talk Guild.

And I'd guess that Cordoba market research has concluded something similar.

I'm in agreement with you. We are a cult, for lack of a better term. The arch back is one of guitar's most misunderstood concepts.
 

plaidseason

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2006
Messages
1,011
Reaction score
351
Location
CT River Valley Shore, USA
I'm in agreement with you. We are a cult, for lack of a better term. The arch back is one of guitar's most misunderstood concepts.
And my take is that aside from Taylor, a good portion of the mid-to-high end acoustic market these days is centered around things that are at least familiarly Martin or Gibson like. Light builds. Aged tops. And the prevalence of ivoroid and butterbean tuning machines and stuff like that on import guitars, etc. I love all that stuff (and even replaced the heavy "Grover" tuners on my inexpensive Simon & Patrick, to improve the mojo, and drastically reduce the weight.

But I do appreciate the unique tone of an arch back dreadnought!
 
Top