Vibrolux Reverb

SFIV1967

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I actually ended up going with a non tube amp, a Fender Tonemaster Deluxe Reverb.
Sounds interesting! And you got the attenuator for home use:

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Ralf
 
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I had a nineties Pro Junior, a tweed/alnico version. Sounded great. It was my number one for years.

Removing the middle screw from the back cover piece is widely recommended because, that close to the wiring, the steel creates some odd sonic artifacts.

I don't like Blues Juniors as much because the Fat switch sounds awful. A PJ plus a good three-knob overdrive pedal costs less, sounds better, and is more adjustable.
 

fronobulax

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Removing the middle screw from the back cover piece is widely recommended because, that close to the wiring, the steel creates some odd sonic artifacts.

My admittedly weak knowledge of electronics and magnetics makes me question whether there is a reason behind this advice or whether it is urban myth. I'm glad to learn, however, so what do the artifacts sound like and what is the hypothesis about their cause? Thanks.
 

Guildedagain

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Solid State and or modeling amps are just fine, all the rage in fact, as are tubes amps, as always.

Old amps need to go to the shop, means traveling, dropping it off, paying, waiting too long, not liking what they did, etc...

With this amp, all you have to do is play.
 
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My admittedly weak knowledge of electronics and magnetics makes me question whether there is a reason behind this advice or whether it is urban myth. I'm glad to learn, however, so what do the artifacts sound like and what is the hypothesis about their cause? Thanks.
I wondered, too. It worked.

It was back in the nineties, so I only vaguely remember. Some kind of microphonics. For a hypothosis, you might ask at the amp forum at TDPRI.com.
 
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I actually ended up going with a non tube amp, a Fender Tonemaster Deluxe Reverb. It was priced right and seems to get good reviews. It should work just fine for my needs.
You chose wisely! 👍🏻

In this Rick Beato vid, they discuss vintage gear, if it's worth it, what drives the price, what's driven by myth, what's the reality behind many overpriced items in comparison with today's gear....THEN, they bring up the question, "What new gear out right now might be a highly sought after piece 20-30 years from now?" Just watch from around the 30 min mark. Should bring a smile to your face. ;)

 

richardp69

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You chose wisely! 👍🏻

In this Rick Beato vid, they discuss vintage gear, if it's worth it, what drives the price, what's driven by myth, what's the reality behind many overpriced items in comparison with today's gear....THEN, they bring up the question, "What new gear out right now might be a highly sought after piece 20-30 years from now?" Just watch from around the 30 min mark. Should bring a smile to your face. ;)

Well, 20 to 30 years from now is problematic for me but for now, I'll just enjoy it. Thanks for the info though, makes me feel like maybe I did something right.
 

HeyMikey

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20-30 years from now just trying to find some quality NOS US made tubes will be next to impossible. If you are young and into tube amps that is an investment to start making and growing now.
 

GGJaguar

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20-30 years from now just trying to find some quality NOS US made tubes will be next to impossible. If you are young and into tube amps that is an investment to start making and growing now.
I stocked up on NOS in the early 1990s. I don't know if you can find decent ones now, but at some point, horders like me will sell off what we have to the next generation.
 

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The big question with amps in the future is, "Will you be able to get components?"
Tube amps with pretty much run for a lifetime if they get serviced. For the most part, tubes will last a long time for 99% of players, but I predict a future in converting oddball tube types to audio uses. I've pretty much resigned myself to my amps being bought simply for the tubes and speakers when I finally sell them. :-(
As far a solid state amps, are you going to be able to get aftermarket pcbs when they fail? Or do you keep buying whole replacement amps when they fail again? I'm not referring to old Peavey Bandits or anything like that, I'm referring to modern manufacture. I was given a Fender Champion 100 simply because Fender does not bother to stock boards for it. They just shipped the guy a new one.
 

Uke

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I had a nineties Pro Junior, a tweed/alnico version. Sounded great. It was my number one for years.

Removing the middle screw from the back cover piece is widely recommended because, that close to the wiring, the steel creates some odd sonic artifacts.

I don't like Blues Juniors as much because the Fat switch sounds awful. A PJ plus a good three-knob overdrive pedal costs less, sounds better, and is more adjustable.
I recently bought a Pro Junior and like it very much. I too owned a Blues Junior back in the 90s and hated it -- the fat switch was useless (for me -- I like clean), and the reverb was really crappy. After owning a 1966 Fender Deluxe, I realized that someone like me who knows nothing about amp electronics should steer clear of any vintage tube amp -- unless you have lots of money, patience, and a competent (and reputable) tech living close by who you will get to know pretty well after a while. My reasoning for buying my new Pro Junior was that it only has 4 tubes, it doesn't kill my old man back, and the tweed its covered in keeps my nostalgia cranked.
 
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The big question with amps in the future is, "Will you be able to get components?"
Tube amps with pretty much run for a lifetime if they get serviced. For the most part, tubes will last a long time for 99% of players, but I predict a future in converting oddball tube types to audio uses. I've pretty much resigned myself to my amps being bought simply for the tubes and speakers when I finally sell them. :-(
As far a solid state amps, are you going to be able to get aftermarket pcbs when they fail? Or do you keep buying whole replacement amps when they fail again? I'm not referring to old Peavey Bandits or anything like that, I'm referring to modern manufacture. I was given a Fender Champion 100 simply because Fender does not bother to stock boards for it. They just shipped the guy a new one.
That's just it though....today's SS/modeling amps are priced to the point where if it craps out after 10-15 years, you likely got your money's worth. Repairing a $700 amp at a cost of $400 doesn't sound smart to begin with.

As for tubes. I think they'll be around for a long time. No worries there. As long as all the expensive boutique tube amp builders keep selling them faster than they can build them, new tubes will be manufactured at a quality level that warrants being loaded in these amps right off the shelf. NOS vintage has been way expensive for a long time. I bet only the most trained sensitive ears can hear the differences between a 1950's Mullard, and a brand new Mullard. They might break up a little differently, but overall, IMO, the new ones are more than satisfactory to put in any vintage amp. And they're a LOT less expensive. I've only ever gone the route of vintage NOS for one single tube in my life, and that was for my turntable pre. ;)
 
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