So You Wanna Be A Rock'n'Roll star

adorshki

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Something reminded me of the Byrds' "Turn Turn Turn" the other day and hadn't heard it in years so pulled it up on Youtube.

And what pops up but a link to another one of my faves, "So You Wanna Be A Rock'n'Roll Star", live at the '67 Monterey Pop Festival.

Well I had to listen to that.


They even invite Hugh Masekela up to do the trumpet part he does in the tune. You remember Hugh Masekela, right, "Grazing in the Grass"?

And for some reason the sped up tempo reminds me of the way the Monkees performed live. :LOL: But then, at the time, the Monkees were seriously close to out-selling the Beatles and the TV show was a monster.

And "Eight Miles High" was already a 15-month old oldie at the time. :LOL: Listening to that one again, I realize it's every bit as good as anything on Revolver which it preceded by about 3 months.

One wonders who had the bigger influence on the other, when the Beatles and the Byrds (or at least McGuinn, anyway) partied together on a fateful day in August '65.
 
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bobouz

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From their earliest days, there were gems on every Byrds album. Then the shift into folk/rock/country produced more memorable stuff. Seems like I had just about every Byrds album, but then a few years back I decided to go strictly with CDs & sold all my albums. Now all I've got is The Notorious Byrd Brothers on a stinkin' cassette tape.

This situation needs to be rectified - Thanks for planting the seed, Al!
 

Teleguy61

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I was a hit or miss Byrds fan back in the day, but I have come to realize they are an enormously important part of American music history.
If you can listen to Turn Turn Turn and not crack a tear, you are a better man than me.
We went to see the Sweetheart of the Rodeo 50th Anniversary show with Marty Stuart's excellent band as backing band, and it was very moving--the whole audience on its feet singing along with every song--great, great show, wonderful musicianship.
Part of our life.....
 

fronobulax

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I was a hit or miss Byrds fan back in the day, but I have come to realize they are an enormously important part of American music history.
If you can listen to Turn Turn Turn and not crack a tear, you are a better man than me.
We went to see the Sweetheart of the Rodeo 50th Anniversary show with Marty Stuart's excellent band as backing band, and it was very moving--the whole audience on its feet singing along with every song--great, great show, wonderful musicianship.
Part of our life.....

I note the evolution of entertainment. There was a time when I would have gone to a concert to hear the band and complained if the audience made too much noise, especially singing along. Those days are past and I will go and join in.
 

DrumBob

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To start, The Byrds' performance at Monterey Pop was not one of their best gigs, in fact, it was one of their worst. Crosby was acting out, making overt political statements, trying to take over the show, they played everything too fast and they were sloppy as hell. There was a real power struggle going on within them at the time. It was also the night that McGuinn and Hillman decided Crosby needed to go, and he was fired shortly thereafter.

The Byrds have been my favorite band for as long as I can remember. They were, IMO, the most creative and influential American band of the 60's, second only to The Beatles in that respect. As great as The Byrds were in the studio, they were never an outstanding live band, even after McGuinn hired Clarence White, Gene Parsons and Skip Batten. Parsons was a terrible rock drummer, for one thing, and Clarence White's playing never moved me, sorry to say. That band was never The Byrds; it was McGuinn's backup band. The Byrds was McGuinn, Crosby, Hillman, Clark and Clarke.

I saw the Sweetheart of The Rodeo tour on two nights, in Albany, NY and NYC, and they were easily the best shows I have attended in years. I couldn't believe I was finally able to see and hear those Byrds tunes played electric with a band, the way they should be played. I fear it will be the last time I'll ever have that experience. McGuinn likes working solo, and Hillman suffers from neuropathy and other senior ailments. He told me several years ago that he's all but retired.
 

Teleguy61

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Well said @DrumBob.
I've been fortunate to see Chris live twice--once with SWOTR and once in a duo with Herb Pedersen, which was also a transcendent performance.
In earlier days, I was always gigging and didn't get to see a lot of shows.
 

crank

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It was sometime in the mid 70's and my friends and I had tix to see the Byrds on their farewell tour at Radio City Music Hall. Well the band apparently broke up for good just before the tour and we got a newly formed Roger Mguinn band. Have to say it wasn't all that great but there were moments.
 

adorshki

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To start, The Byrds' performance at Monterey Pop was not one of their best gigs, in fact, it was one of their worst. Crosby was acting out, making overt political statements, trying to take over the show, they played everything too fast and they were sloppy as hell. There was a real power struggle going on within them at the time. It was also the night that McGuinn and Hillman decided Crosby needed to go, and he was fired shortly thereafter.

The Byrds have been my favorite band for as long as I can remember. They were, IMO, the most creative and influential American band of the 60's, second only to The Beatles in that respect. As great as The Byrds were in the studio, they were never an outstanding live band, even after McGuinn hired Clarence White, Gene Parsons and Skip Batten. Parsons was a terrible rock drummer, for one thing, and Clarence White's playing never moved me, sorry to say. That band was never The Byrds; it was McGuinn's backup band. The Byrds was McGuinn, Crosby, Hillman, Clark and Clarke.
Great McGuinn bio, here:
https://uniqueguitar.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-guitars-of-roger-mcguinn.html

Played for Bobby Darin(!) and Simon&Garfunkel, don't think I ever knew that. 😲

Funny about Crosby, seems like he was always a bit a of a bad boy. :D Loved him as John Larroquette's AA sponsor in that show.

He of the liver transplant, back then.....:LOL:
 

Boneman

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Had to play Tamborine Man on my D1212 as soon as I got it, the Byrds version of course ;). They were outstanding, and would say Eight Miles High is probably my favorite of theirs. Gotta go listen to that now, thanks
 
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