Since the Grim Reaper eventually comes to say Hello

wileypickett

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Although I like what Yasujiro Ozu did; his marker does not bear his name but has only a single Japanese character meaning "nothingness, non-existence, the void".

Seeing the name of my one of my two or three favorite fim directors mentioned on LTG about knocked me out of my chair. I'm amazed at the diversity of people's interests and knowledge here.
 
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In overly congested Germany where older unvisited cemetery graves are now being repurposed out of necessity for space, a recent trend of protected old growth forest land being used as a "memorial forest", is steadily gaining popularity. People's urns are buried at the foot of a chosen tree. Two of my cousins have gone this route in the last 5 years outside of Hannover. There are no markers, just a trail and a provided memorial "tree map" pamphlet... and benches along the way. If you didn't know any better, you'd think you were just walking through the woods on a well kept trail. I like the idea. A much more peaceful place to visit than rows upon rows of headstones decorated w/ overpriced cut flowers.! It also solves a lot of cemetery crowding issues, while in turn also strengthening the protection of old growth forests. (y)

 

davismanLV

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Yeah, when I'm gone... whomever is here to lament (or not) my passing should just remember me and not worry about my physical remains. Burning is one way. I remember when i was 17, and rode at Foxfield Riding School in Thousand Oaks, CA, we had a MORE than charming old man... Dr. Victor Mashek. He was a veterinarian that boarded his horse there. He was a dapper and amazing man who would come to anyone's aid. He rode his horse all the time over the hill to my parents ranch. And it was always such a joy to see him. Old man from Germany. With his sweet accent and his kind ways. We were all so lucky to know him. I remember when that one gray horse ran away with a young rider and jumped the arena into some barrels and he flipped over and threw the girl off and then broke his neck. The poor thing. We had to lift his neck up and then he was dead. (sorry totally random memory) Then one day his horse came back to Foxfield without him. Priden Green was the horses name. And it was all hands on deck and because my kids (students) and my dad and I knew the hills between Foxfield and our place (about an hours ride) we searched and searched and .... honestly. I went to every nook and cranny to find our friend. But he never was found, until two years later. Someone hiking up in the hills found a skull. Poor Victor, who'd fallen on hard times and was used to being the benefactor of us all, ran out of money. He wouldn't be able to keep his horse, and live his life. So he rode Green up into the hills and then sent him back home. He'd shot himself in the head. I can't even grasp this amazing man's crisis. We all would've kept him solvent and happy... if we'd had the chance. So my take on death is mostly, I hope I don't wake up one day. Or just go quickly. There are good and bad ways to die. To you, my friends... I wish the best ways. Just done. No drama, no ambulances or hysteria. Just go to sleep and then gone. Like our friend Jeff who was younger than me and he just went to sleep and didn't wake up two months ago. I think it's traumatic for loved ones. But for us.... it's the way to go.
 

LesB3

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I've been thinking about this myself (and I'm only 45), but there are no guarantees on anything, so my last day could be tomorrow. I've always thought it would be cool to go die on the top of a mountain or while floating down a river in a canoe, but in the end, I think that I would like a true "ashes to ashes" burial (i.e. in a cotton bag under a tree). But, I recently heard about this one which is a new favorite:

Muerto Parado - "Dead Man Standing"

Of course, I would want it to be a surprise so that anyone showing up would be shocked (one last time) seeing me sitting there in a lawn chair w/ my Gretsch, cigar in mouth, maybe some beer cans or a whiskey bottle at my feet.

Then they can toss me in a bag and bury me under a tree.
 

Rich Cohen

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The cultures that require the body to be buried sans coffin, simply in a shroud IMO have got it right. Most cemeteries don't allow burial without a coffin as well as a concrete liner (the death industry is after all a business). My son who passed away in July, 2020 was cremated, but the cemetery in Washington, DC insisted that the box containing his ashes was interred in a concrete vault in the ground!
 

tommym

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It's cremation for me. I'm taking all my Brazilian Rosewood with me.

Tommy
 

DeArmond Hammer

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Like @Rich Cohen, I want to be recycled back to nature. My preference would be to feed the birds (and save their prey) in a Buddhist sky burial, but if my family can't get me to Tibet, I would be happy getting a shroud (so my corpse-face is not how I'm remembered) and a hole in the ground.
 

Rich Cohen

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Like @Rich Cohen, I want to be recycled back to nature. My preference would be to feed the birds (and save their prey) in a Buddhist sky burial, but if my family can't get me to Tibet, I would be happy getting a shroud (so my corpse-face is not how I'm remembered) and a hole in the ground.
Like the Tibetans, the Parsi community of India, originally from Persia (hence the name after they arrived in India ca. 1000 AD), also expose the body at the top of a Tower of Silence, as it is called, mostly to be attended to by vultures, other birds and insects. The majority of Parsi-s in India have resided in and around Mumbai (Bombay) for centuries. They are known for their business acumen. The Parsi Tata family famously owns a large conglomerate, based in Mumbai.
 

davismanLV

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Rich, and everyone.... the reason I recounted that story of Victor, is that to me, he went the way we all should. He rotted, he decomposed, all the local animals, birds, coyotes, wolves, insects.... everything fed off of him. And then he decomposed and nourished more local flora to thrive. Isn't that the best way? I mean, by then I'm dead, what happens to my body is of no consequence to me. And most traditional forms available to us in the USA are about preservation (waste of space and time in my opinion) or cremation, which basically renders us as ashes. And while ashes do have some value in certain instances, I mostly think just rotting out like old Victor is the way to go. Sorry if this is too brutal but honestly ... once I'm dead..... Cheers friends!!
 
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If you're gonna give back to Mother Earth, there's more than just replenishing her outer skin! Let's go downtown!! That's why next year, I'll be opening a new private hospice facility in Iceland!! Where upon your last breath, the ceiling of your room will retract. Next, your bed which doubles as a harness for a giant trebuchet arm than spans 70 ft outside of the building will, after a flatline signal, count backwards from 10, then....fling your rag doll w/ a flickering brain ass right smack into the bubbling pool of a live volcano!! 🤘🏻😎🤘🏻 Taking preorders now!
 

beecee

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A childhood friend is a funeral director.

Regarding the metal or concrete vaults, they always try and upsell you, or your loved ones, at a very vunerable time.

"Why would we need a liner or vault if x person is in a coffin" the bereaved will ask.

With head slightly bowed and lower lip protruding the funeral director/salesman will mutter and stammerr..."well....I'm not sure how to say this gently....ummmm...leakage".

Yup...it's a business alright.

My first wife passed at 40 after an 11 year bout with cancer. She and her brother coauthored her eulogy.

In part..."although a Christian my wish is to be creamated.....I'll show that cancer in the end!!!"
 

JohnW63

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After reading this thread, I'm going to eat healthier, get a lot more exercise, and worm my way into all of your wills. I figure there are going to be a lot of guitars without a home when your time comes.
 
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