My fellow Americans:

poser

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Frosty said:
My desk calendar today. Happy Independence Day to all!

Later on today that's going to involve lots of pops, whistles, booms and bangs.

I'm talking about my neighbor's fireworks. :lol:
 

cjd-player

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Yes, happy 4th of July, everyone.

And special thanks to those of you who have served in our military to keep us independent and free.

I was at Fort McHenry in Baltimore a few weeks ago (Where the Star Spangled Banner was written).
I was struck and moved by the courage of the common citizens (many of the defenders at the fort were volunteer townsmen) who stood boldly in the face the British bombardment, turned the British away, and changed the course of American history.
 

marcellis

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I bought rounds of drinks in two French bars on July 4th.

I toasted Admiral de Grasse, Compte Rochambeau and Marquis de Lafayette for their timely assistance.

Americans ought to know that without Admiral DeGrasse, there probably wouldn't be a United States.
That poor guy beat the Royal Navy exactly once in his life -- at Yorktown.
One year later, he was a prisoner on a British Man o' War.

He prevented the Royal Navy from rescuing Cornwallis. He had the inner position at the harbor
and the British could not break through.

Cornwallis' fife and drum corps played "The World Turned Upside Down".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/François_Joseph_Paul_de_Grasse

Battle of Chesapeake and Yorktown Campaign

[Degrasse] came to the aid of Washington and Rochambeau's Expédition Particulière, setting sail with 3,000 men from Saint-Domingue. De Grasse landed the 3,000 French reinforcements in Virginia, and immediately afterward decisively defeated the British fleet in the Battle of the Chesapeake in September 1781. He drew away the British forces and blockaded the coast until Lord Cornwallis surrendered, ensuring the independence of the United States of America.
200 French soldiers died at Yorktown.
80 Americans died.
500 British died.

Admiral de Grasse

 

poser

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It's the morning of the fifth and a mite too early to be buying rounds. But tonight I'll raise a toast to Admiral deGrasse, and perhaps one to the Marquis de Lafayette. :D
 

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Missed out on all the festivities myself. Was sitting in the local hospital with my wife(long story, will not repeat here), who came down with diverticulitis. Ended up being a 12 hour day.
Still managed to get a couple of hours in on the military channel, viewed a couple of shows on Gettysburg and the American Revolution. Did not know that the hated Stamp Act required a revenue stamp to be affixed to every single printed item, i.e., six page newspaper = six stamps. Also found out that as horrendous as the casualties were at Picket's Charge were, they should have been much, much higher.
"Canister". <shudder>
 
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