Holy Freaking Square Neck!

Brad Little

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Recently traded my F40 for an 8 string squareneck, certainly takes some work to get used to the A6 tuning, especially since I've never even used open tunings on guitar.
 

spoox

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My 1937 National squareneck...Style "1 1/2" (what they call Style 1s with an engraved wiggle border) nickel plated German silver...not that many made at this point as National was selling more electric Hawaiian guitars--it was around this time they were also making some brass bodied ones with colored
etched designs and wooden square necks so they could be sold for under $100--this one would have sold for $125 new. The tricones have the clearest
tone and best sustain of the metal resonators--John Dopyera never cared for the single cone National guitars--that's one of the reasons he left National
and started work on the Dobro spider cone guitar.
 

GGJaguar

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Wow! That sets a high benchmark when you start playing your reso Guild. ;)
 

spoox

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then there's:
My friend Robert Armstrong, artist and one of the founders of the Cheap Suit Serenaders. His specialty on steel are those fast King Bennie Nawahi style licks.
Also adept on uke, guitar, accordion, and musical saw!
 

Neal

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I finally sold my squareneck. I could never get past the fundamentals to a point where I felt like I really knew what I was doing. I also found it frustrating that minor chord shapes are in such limited supply on the instrument in either G or D open tuning. As a singer-songwriter, I also found it hard to play well and sing well, at the same time

One thing is certain, though. When you break one out in a bar and start playing, heads turn. People gravitate to the tone and the style of play.
 

chazmo

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I wonder if he's a Theramin player in his spare time. That's what the intro had me thinking of.

Thanks for posting that, GAD. I don't think I've ever heard a guitar played like that before.
 

dbirchett

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Here is a dobro player that uses behind the bar bends to simulate a pedal steel.
 

beecee

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Thanks for posting!!

Great stuff, real talent. I stopped trying to play mine 30+ years ago and based on the videos I doubt daily practice would have brought me to that level!!

I have an OMI Dobro Model 36. Looking at that National I wonder if the polish job on it has done anything to decrease the value....I know it's not the same as refinishing a wood guitar but I've allowed mine to mellow over the years. I'm sure it would polish out nicely but I'd let the next owner decide.

I still have two real bottle neck slides from 1980 +/-. I do believe one is from a bottle of Mateus rose and I know for sure the other came from a long drive home from Bully Hill.
 

Neal

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Thanks for posting!!

Great stuff, real talent. I stopped trying to play mine 30+ years ago and based on the videos I doubt daily practice would have brought me to that level!!

I have an OMI Dobro Model 36. Looking at that National I wonder if the polish job on it has done anything to decrease the value....I know it's not the same as refinishing a wood guitar but I've allowed mine to mellow over the years. I'm sure it would polish out nicely but I'd let the next owner decide.

I still have two real bottle neck slides from 1980 +/-. I do believe one is from a bottle of Mateus rose and I know for sure the other came from a long drive home from Bully Hill.
Often the highest-priced vintage Nationals are the ones with the thickest patina. The original polychrome finishes adhered poorly, and often flaked off!
 
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