G-41

Rudi

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I took some new pics to show the measurements. I read somewhere that the scale length is the actual length PLUS some sort of reserve. So the length is always more. How much that ‘reserve‘ should be, I don’t know.
I also took a closer pic from the label at the inside because there is a second number written on it (you must look good to see it) 03175.
Also the model number on the label makes me wonder : G+I (always thought it’s g41) maybe it stands for something else? But I don,t think so.
Grtz Rudi
 

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hansmoust

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Rudi said:
I also took a closer pic from the label at the inside because there is a second number written on it (you must look good to see it) 03175.
Also the model number on the label makes me wonder : G+I (always thought it’s g41) maybe it stands for something else?
The model designation is G41. Compare the writing of the 4 with the 4 in the serial number.

And the body’s measures. 43 / 30 / 32. Length 53.
It's a G-41 body! No doubt about that!

If you really want to know more, stick a smart phone into the soundhole under the bridge and photograph that part of the top.
That should probably tell us what's going on with that guitar.

Sincerely,

Hans Moust
www.guitarsgalore.nl
 

Rudi

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I asked the luthier not to worry about the mic. (To cut expenses) So you can see it’s just hooked up with some tape. But it still works.
How that dark piece of wood got there. Cannot imagine they put it there afterwards. Not through the soundhole I think. I don’t know.
 

davismanLV

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That dark wood is the rosewood bridge plate. Those are placed underneath the spruce, which is a relatively soft wood. If you did to the spruce what's done to the rosewood (or maple) with the ball ends and bridge pins and stress and strain, it would tear the spruce up and come through the top. That's put in when the bracing is done and before the top is ever put on the guitar. So that's original I'm pretty sure, unless Hans thinks it's changed but I doubt it.
 

Rudi

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Wow, that’s good news, I guess. Am I rich now? :)
@Hans : potverkoffie, now I see we live 1hr from each other. Taking a look at the guitar shouldn’t be a problem.
 

Rudi

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Maybe by accident but they must have known it? Since the bridge was mounted on the right place. Maybe it was on command for somebody?
Anyway, thank you very much for helping me out.
 

hansmoust

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Maybe by accident but they must have known it? Since the bridge was mounted on the right place. Maybe it was on command for somebody?
You're drawing the wrong conclusion, probably because you are not familiar with the various procedures and their sequence during production.

'Knowing it' is not the same thing as 'finding out'. This is the most logical thing they could do, after finding out, short of destroying the guitar!

If it was a special order it would have been mentioned on the label!

Sincerely,

Hans Moust
www.guitarsgalore.nl
 

Rudi

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I know. But I was hoping to be that lucky guy ... On the other hand, it is a good guitar that sounds magnificent. Build by craftsmen
 

adorshki

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I took some new pics to show the measurements. I read somewhere that the scale length is the actual length PLUS some sort of reserve. So the length is always more. How much that ‘reserve‘ should be, I don’t know.
That explains why the actual length of strings (the "speaking length") isn't always exactly the same as the scale length. it's due to the compensation (angle) of the saddle. But again that is speaking length not actual scale length.
But in most cases steps one and 2 of the design process of a good guitar are to select the string gauge to be used and the scale length they'll be used on.
Everything else follows from those parameters with a view towards maximizing the potential energy of that combination, with the voicing characteristics determined by body size, shape, bracing, and woods.
From Stew-Mac, a luthier's supply site:
WHAT IS SCALE LENGTH?
A guitar's scale length is calculated by measuring the distance from the front edge of the nut, where it butts against the end of the fingerboard, to the center of the 12th (octave) fret, then doubling that measurement.
Compensation explained here:
You mentioned for example that when you measured from the nut to the 12th fret you got 12.8 inches, which as it turns out when doubled is 25.6" or most likely the actual 25-5/8 that I mentioned previously, and which is in fact the scale length of a D40 as opposed to the G41.
At the time I thought you'd measured incorrectly by measuring to a point half way between the 11th &12th fret wires, and that measuring to the 12th fret would then give the true scale length of a G41.
I never expected it to be a G41 with a D40 neck but your measurements confirmed the guitar has a shorter scale than it's spec'd for.
I so see a lot of commentary out there treating scale length as speaking length but that's technically not correct.
Hopefully it's a little clearer now.
 
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