Collings owners?

tommym

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Cost?

Every time I priced a new Collings custom build, I was always in the ballpark of a direct commissioned Froggy Bottom. Not saying that Collings are not worth the cost as they do offer models and trim combinations that Froggy Bottom does not. Used is different though as a used Collings can be more reasonably priced than a used Froggy Bottom. Still, you must shop around.

Tommy
 

Westerly Wood

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Cost?

Every time I priced a new Collings custom build, I was always in the ballpark of a direct commissioned Froggy Bottom. Not saying that Collings are not worth the cost as they do offer models and trim combinations that Froggy Bottom does not. Used is different though as a used Collings can be more reasonably priced than a used Froggy Bottom. Still, you must shop around.

Tommy
really like Froggy Bottoms. such an interesting name and they been around a long time.
 

wileypickett

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I have a Collings OM. Nice guitar. I use it for touring Europe and the UK, as it fits easily in the overhead in planes and I don’t get hassled for carrying it onboard. And very dependable.

But I have to say, I don’t play it much at home. Doesn’t have the personality of some of my Guilds.
 

Westerly Wood

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Lots of very interesting responses! I have had an opportunity to play all these brands at Elderly over the years. Couldn't afford to buy any of them though 😔
interestingly enough Dread, I sold the Cruz cause I did not think I was worthy of it. I don't mean about my ability playing etc, I mean I felt the $ could be used for more important family purposes and my Br at the time was enuff for me, and I was playing the Guild way more, as it was better for fingerpicking. my wife was like, but you need 2 acoustics, there is no reason to sell the Cruz, but i was stubborn.

i was happy to sell it to a "real" gigging musician, who played it at my house for like an hour, he even put on new EJ17s and was just a phenomenal bluegrass player. he made that thing sing. he was having financial issues too so i gave him a good deal. he is quite known locally in bluegrass circles. nice dude, and i always like helping people out.

and i like my D35 better than the Cruz, so it all worked out. but selling acoustics sucks, meaning, you always wish you had kept some etc or had more like a year down the road.
 

Br1ck

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While they are really well made, and CNC has a lot to do with that, I have never been tempted to buy one. They are voiced too bright. Now I understand they have a few new models voiced toward the Martin side of things, but I'd put my money into an Authentic. This of course is purely subjective.

I'm addicted to F style mandolins, so the A styles are cheap in comparison. But even the base MF is well over $5K, closer to 6K. One thing though, Collings will give you a really nice flame maple back. The MT A style is a very solid instrument. But again, if you want the Gibson tone, you need to buy a Gibson.
 

twocorgis

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While they are really well made, and CNC has a lot to do with that, I have never been tempted to buy one. They are voiced too bright. Now I understand they have a few new models voiced toward the Martin side of things, but I'd put my money into an Authentic. This of course is purely subjective.
I agree with you about that. The two Collings that I owned were both a bit too bright for me, and were also rosewood, and I'm just more of a mahogany guy. The Bourgeois that I have now really strikes the perfect balance, and I love the neck on it too. I also likes the way Dana thinks, he's a brilliant guy.
 

walrus

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interestingly enough Dread, I sold the Cruz cause I did not think I was worthy of it. I don't mean about my ability playing etc, I mean I felt the $ could be used for more important family purposes...
At first I laughed out loud at the "worthy" comment! Then I read the rest and I totally agree. I had the same issue with the Sadowsky I bought but before I bought it. I was watching for one for literally over a year until I found a used one that was exactly what I was looking for but with enough dings, etc. to drop the price.

walrus
 

West R Lee

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I'm really Jonesing after a Collings Dread and an "A style mandolin, but oh the cost :oops:

From what I've seen and played at Elderly instruments, they are the most perfect production instruments being made in the US currently.
Marc, if you want one that feels like your DV52, get a D1 or D2. 1's are mahogany and 2's are rosewood. Incredible guitars. I used to think of them as WAY overpriced, but yesterday I looked up "list price" on a new D55 Guild w/pickup.........$4850! Collings guitars aren't overpriced by comparison. Get a great used one for $3000-$3500. I love the sound of my CJ, but still have a touch of trouble not stepping on the frets with the short scale. The D2 neck feels just like my DV72 to me. Mine is a D2HA and Lord, what a sound.

As far as build quality, you'll not find better.....anywhere. Though the build is much lighter than any of my Guilds, they're slightly heavier than the Santa Cruz guitars I've owned.

West
 
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Br1ck

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Westerly Wood, we could both take half a lifetime convincing the average guy why we like D 35s over more expensive guitars. Years after buying mine, my 70 D 35 continues to grow on me. How many guitars have that ability? Playing one for an hour will not convince anyone. But over time I have come to appreciate the dry, balanced tone. The neck for me is perfect. No matter how fast, runs never blur together. Maybe as I've gotten better, I can use what an old D 35 provides. A lot of it is old wood. Other guitars excel at certain things. My Texan is dryer and thumpier in the bass. You can palm mute it and still get that Johnny Cash thing going. My Martin D 35 Custom does bluegrass and country rock splendidly. But there is something universal about the Guild. Plus, I'm free to take it anywhere worry free. One more bruise won't make a difference. 51 years old now an it just sings.
 

Westerly Wood

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Westerly Wood, we could both take half a lifetime convincing the average guy why we like D 35s over more expensive guitars. Years after buying mine, my 70 D 35 continues to grow on me. How many guitars have that ability? Playing one for an hour will not convince anyone. But over time I have come to appreciate the dry, balanced tone. The neck for me is perfect. No matter how fast, runs never blur together. Maybe as I've gotten better, I can use what an old D 35 provides. A lot of it is old wood. Other guitars excel at certain things. My Texan is dryer and thumpier in the bass. You can palm mute it and still get that Johnny Cash thing going. My Martin D 35 Custom does bluegrass and country rock splendidly. But there is something universal about the Guild. Plus, I'm free to take it anywhere worry free. One more bruise won't make a difference. 51 years old now an it just sings.
Brick, it's funny you mention that. the old guy I gave my (I guess it was last year) '70s D35 too, the one that I got super cheap off reverb that had many issues and the soundhole had to be enlarged (by me) as it was falling away...I was thinking of trying to buy that back from him, as he fixed it up enuff that it wont blow up and i really liked that particular D35 for finger picking.

my '83 which I hope to never sell, is a strumming champion. i would put it up against any D-18 or D40 and I think i might come out even and maybe on some songs, on top. :)

...of course with the 2.0 mm picks I prefer, I usually win....lol
 

Br1ck

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The early Collings are just now getting old enough to have aged. Funny, I was outraged at the time when I looked at the price tag of the first one I played. Over $3000! Outrageous.
 

JohnnyMo

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I have a D2H and also a 1970 F-50R, Brazilian, that had the top replaced about 20 years ago. The Collings is way easier to play that's for sure, but I think the F-50R is just a bit stronger, hard to describe. Have to A-B them with the exact same strings, same song sometime. I got the jumbo for Finger Picking Merle Travis type stuff, Freight Train, Bluebelle, Pilgrim Blues, etc. The guild needs some work to compete with the Collings, as the Collings is just perfect up and down the neck. So I am looking at another guitar most likely, perhaps a Bourgeois, SC, but want to get a cutaway. There's the back of the F-50R on a 140 year old piece of Douglas fir, Firewood! Not sure how old that piece of BRW was when they made those guitars. I got this one for 1500$ in 2019. Needs work though. So took a gamble and so far am happy with it! Collings is the workhorse and the F-50R is kind of a show off guitar, fun to play but might loosen the strings up here and let it rest until I can get it to a Luthier.
IMG_20200803_161415704.jpg
 

Bill Ashton

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I had a Collings D2H for 3 or 4 years, which I had won at Kaufman Kamp (really!). Absolutely beautiful
guitar, build fit and finish was flawless...sorry to say, but a notch or two above my NH Guild D-55...

BUT...I could just not get on with the neck. Just something about it, try as I might, I just did not enjoy
playing it. Tried several makes of strings, had it set up...twice. Just didn't do it for me. So eventually onto
Reverb she went.

If one gets the urge, this is one I would NOT try via mail-order, you must try the neck profile to see if it
is "you." They have two profiles, last time was aware...
 

West R Lee

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I have a D2H and also a 1970 F-50R, Brazilian, that had the top replaced about 20 years ago. The Collings is way easier to play that's for sure, but I think the F-50R is just a bit stronger, hard to describe. Have to A-B them with the exact same strings, same song sometime. I got the jumbo for Finger Picking Merle Travis type stuff, Freight Train, Bluebelle, Pilgrim Blues, etc. The guild needs some work to compete with the Collings, as the Collings is just perfect up and down the neck. So I am looking at another guitar most likely, perhaps a Bourgeois, SC, but want to get a cutaway. There's the back of the F-50R on a 140 year old piece of Douglas fir, Firewood! Not sure how old that piece of BRW was when they made those guitars. I got this one for 1500$ in 2019. Needs work though. So took a gamble and so far am happy with it! Collings is the workhorse and the F-50R is kind of a show off guitar, fun to play but might loosen the strings up here and let it rest until I can get it to a Luthier. View attachment 15624
Try that beautiful Brazilian jumbo in Open D tuning. That will take the load off, and you'll love noodling in the tuning, I've been keeping my D2HA in Open D and have had a blast with it. You can feel it vibrate all the way to your spine........just incredible.

West
 

JohnnyMo

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Good suggestion WesterLee, I have tuned it down a whole step, D tuning, and down a half step as well! (F-50R) The Collings D2H is a monster bluegrass guitar in my opinion, where the Guild Jumbo is probably more suited to other styles. Cannot go wrong with Brazilian Rosewood though, no matter what! It's a keeper, for sure. I would consider selling perhaps at some point but would have to take it to a good Luthier first no matter what. Always easier to sell a guitar that needs no repairs.

I also have another f-50R, a 1971 model and it looks like Indian Rosewood on that one. It's not nearly as loud but it had a pickup installed at some point and I suspect that might be deadening the bridge somehow. It's just not very loud at all. Got this one from Guitar Center. Not much history on either of them. Internet purchases basically.

I'll post again one of these days after I show them to a Luthier.

JM
 
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