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Thread: Repair shop sign

  1. #21
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreadnut View Post
    Then W. Edwards Deming brought his manufacturing philosophy to Japan after being rejected in the U.S. The rest is history.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=14&cad=rja& uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiWmt_qqqvjAhUPac0KHYxnB78QFjANeg QIABAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fdeming.org%2Fdeming%2Fdem ing-the-man&usg=AOvVaw1v2GM1Oiq8qSfMQJJEBmoD
    "Linkee no workee" (speaking of stereotypes), but I think this is what you wanted to show:

    https://deming.org/deming/timeline


    Also just in case it got by some folks, that pic of the '70 Subaru was entirely tongue-in-cheek, they were the last of "the first wave" to come to the US and that first model didn't exactly actually catch on, as one might imagine.
    False starts, yes.
    Ultimate victory, yes, generally acknowledged as the Honda Accord.

    And how did theystart?
    With the Cub.


    I remember well as a young man of 20, hearing one of the 2 40-year-old engineers where I worked at the time, saying "It's a real car !"
    Engineer number 1 drove a Mercedes. Engineer number 2 drove a VW Dasher.
    Both of 'em had worked on the B52 avionics retrofit program during Viet Nam era, genuine flag-wavers but not jingoists.
    Me? I was enamored with my second car, a woefully hot-rodded '67 Camaro that ate parts with such frequency I only kept it for about 3 months.
    At the time the reliability of Honda cars was unknown, but the point was I didn't believe utilitarian imports would ever gain the lion's share of the market over "good old American muscle."
    Still, that comment always stuck with me, like writing on the wall.
    And in the aftermath of the first oil embargo fuel-efficient cars were getting some real close scrutiny.
    (A couple of jobs later around '77 another engineer bought the then-radical BMW 320i ranting about how for the same money he got better power-to-weight and sheer construction quality than the new Malibu wagon he'd been considering.)
    Eventually after a 2-year love affair with a 1970 Olds Cutlass my first (9 year old used) Mazda RX-7 won me over in '88.
    After about a year of unadulterated reliability and driving enjoyment, I "got" the Japanese philosophy:
    Keep it light and cheap and easy to maintain.
    And in Mazda's case with the RX-7 at least, FUN to drive.
    Still, I did keep the Cutlass for a few years because there is still nothing like cubic inches when it comes to huge torque delivered without any high rpm fuss.
    Last edited by adorshki; 07-10-2019 at 11:08 PM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  2. #22
    Senior Member dreadnut's Avatar
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    Thanks Al, my "copy link" is on the fritz. Wait a minute, there's another German reference...
    TODAY is the TOMORROW you spent all day YESTERDAY acting like there was no.

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  3. #23
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreadnut View Post
    Thanks Al, my "copy link" is on the fritz. Wait a minute, there's another German reference...
    Let's face it, when it comes to cultural stereotypes and German ones in particular, we've had one purveyor of same reinforcing America's perceptions for oh, about 90 years:


    Last new strip was in '06 and it's still in reprints. (!!!)
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by DThomasC View Post
    It's a little bit racist, but you're making fun of Germans, so it's OK.
    German is a race?

    =O.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by SFIV1967 View Post
    Oh no worries! We are far less polite here in Europe! (Think Nuuska's jokes from Finland). In any case the sign is almost unreadable for a German...

    Which is the Americanized spelling of German "Heinlein". Heinlein seems to come from the given name Heinrich and Heinlein means like "little Hein(rich)".

    Ralf
    Okay, I'll bite. Who is Nuuska and what are some of Nuuska's jokes?

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by richardp69 View Post
    Sorry for the veer all but I remember growing up as a kid, the words "Made In Japan" were synonymous with junk and low quality. Don't know if it was ever actually true but if so, those folks turned things around pretty well I do believe.
    It's true.

    By the end of World War II, the only country with it's heavy industry and its economy both still in good shape was the US. Russia still had factories, but it also had famine and, because of its staggering war casualties, not enough workers. The US Marshall Plan helped western Europe, including Germany, rebuild. (If the US had done that after the First World War, there wouldn't have been a Second.)

    So the post-war era (from the end of the war through the sixties) brought unprecedented prosperity to the US. The wealth wasn't shared by all Americans, but it was shared by many.

    The US also invested billions in Japan. One thing Japan used the money for was to rebuild its shattered industrial base - first with factories that cranked out the cheap, easy-to-make "Made in Japan" crap we remember.

    Then, after a few years, they sank the profits more advanced industrialization, and the big manufacturing dynasties we know today emerged.

    By the time the seventies rolled around, Germany, Japan, England, France, Italy, and others were cranking out great products in their modern factories. And US factories built in the twenties and thirties were getting - well - old.

    So what did Americans do? Start buying imports. Why settle for a Chevy when you could get a VW or a Honda (like the ad above in post 21) that cost less and lasted longer? Why buy an Oldsmobile when you could buy a Volvo that was safer and just as comfortable?

    US investment followed that trend, and that's when the promises and perils of globalization began to emerge.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 07-11-2019 at 02:05 PM.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by gilded View Post
    I loved Robert Heinlein novels when I was a kid. Can anyone tell me how to pronounce his last name?
    Like timeline.

  8. #28
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    It's true.
    The US Marshall Plan helped western Europe, including Germany, rebuild. (If the US had done that after the First World War, there wouldn't have been a Second.)
    The US also invested billions in Japan. One thing Japan used the money for was to rebuild its shattered industrial base - first with factories that cranked out the cheap, easy-to-make "Made in Japan" crap we remember.
    Am I the only one who feels like I've read this somewhere before?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post


    So what did Americans do? Start buying imports. Why settle for a Chevy when you could get a VW or a Honda (like the ad above in post 21) that cost less and lasted longer? Why buy an Oldsmobile when you could buy a Volvo that was safer and just as comfortable?
    Oh right. I posted that pic.
    But the point was that it was actually the oil crisis that opened the door, followed by Detroit's failure to change quickly enough to keep the imports at bay.
    The strength of the dollar also made those German cars a much better value in the late '70's-early '80's.
    BUT America DID still want a lot more interior room than most imports provided:
    Enter the Mini-van.
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Okay, I'll bite. Who is Nuuska and what are some of Nuuska's jokes?
    http://www.letstalkguild.com/ltg/sho...sense-of-humor

    Quote Originally Posted by dreadnut View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gilded View Post
    I loved Robert Heinlein novels when I was a kid. Can anyone tell me how to pronounce his last name?
    "Hine-line."
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Like timeline.
    Charlie, y'really gotta remember to read all posts before posting.
    (Not that I haven't been guilty of rushing to post myself, occasionally.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    German is a race?
    You probably haven't read the Katzenjammer Kids.

    BTW<
    Last edited by adorshki; 07-11-2019 at 03:35 PM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    "Linkee no workee" (speaking of stereotypes), but I think this is what you wanted to show:

    https://deming.org/deming/timeline


    Also just in case it got by some folks, that pic of the '70 Subaru was entirely tongue-in-cheek, they were the last of "the first wave" to come to the US and that first model didn't exactly actually catch on, as one might imagine.
    False starts, yes.
    Ultimate victory, yes, generally acknowledged as the Honda Accord.

    And how did theystart?
    With the Cub.


    I remember well as a young man of 20, hearing one of the 2 40-year-old engineers where I worked at the time, saying "It's a real car !"
    Engineer number 1 drove a Mercedes. Engineer number 2 drove a VW Dasher.
    Both of 'em had worked on the B52 avionics retrofit program during Viet Nam era, genuine flag-wavers but not jingoists.
    Me? I was enamored with my second car, a woefully hot-rodded '67 Camaro that ate parts with such frequency I only kept it for about 3 months.
    At the time the reliability of Honda cars was unknown, but the point was I didn't believe utilitarian imports would ever gain the lion's share of the market over "good old American muscle."
    Still, that comment always stuck with me, like writing on the wall.
    And in the aftermath of the first oil embargo fuel-efficient cars were getting some real close scrutiny.
    (A couple of jobs later around '77 another engineer bought the then-radical BMW 320i ranting about how for the same money he got better power-to-weight and sheer construction quality than the new Malibu wagon he'd been considering.)
    Eventually after a 2-year love affair with a 1970 Olds Cutlass my first (9 year old used) Mazda RX-7 won me over in '88.
    After about a year of unadulterated reliability and driving enjoyment, I "got" the Japanese philosophy:
    Keep it light and cheap and easy to maintain.
    And in Mazda's case with the RX-7 at least, FUN to drive.
    Still, I did keep the Cutlass for a few years because there is still nothing like cubic inches when it comes to huge torque delivered without any high rpm fuss.
    I worked at Lucent Technologies in 1994 (first American manufacturer to win the award). I still have some trinkets.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deming_Prize

    Ralph
    Last edited by F312; 07-11-2019 at 03:56 PM.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    Am I the only one who feels like I've read this somewhere before? . . .
    Only if you were the only one looking over my shoulder when I typed it.

    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    . . . Charlie, y'really gotta remember to read all posts before posting. . . .
    Someone got up on the bossy side of the bed today!

    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    . . . You probably haven't read the Katzenjammer Kids. . . .
    Why probably not? Loved those guys. And Major Hoople. And Little Nemo in Slumberland. The best (and strangest) of the oldies: Krazy Kat.

    And I sit corrected. According to Urban Dictionary, these days some people use racist to describe any prejudice: Racist

    So now we know: like a lot of other words over the past few years, the meaning of racist has changed - e.g. awesome, epic, existential, guys, iconic, literally, and perfect.

    Nothing wrong with that. A chauvinist used to have a capital C and meant someone who favored everything French. The way we use it now is much handier.

    PS - Seeing Germans called a race was a little disturbing, which is why I brought it up. The Nazis pushed the idea that nationalities and religions were races.

    It's creepy to run into someone who thinks that way, so it was a minor relief to see the Urban Dictionary entry. All's right with the world. (Except for all you people reading over my shoulder. Sheesh!)
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 07-13-2019 at 11:18 PM.

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