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Thread: Sloped Shoulder vs Dreadnought shape

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark WW View Post
    Actually the slope shouder (I think?) is a derivation of the dread or vice versa....
    Right - the slope shoulder IS a dreadnought. So is a Gibson (and Epiphone) AJ - "advanced jumbo" - they're dreadnoughts. So it's just a question comparing slope shoulder and square shoulder. About that, I have no answers.
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  2. #12
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    I have some of each. I can't tell that there is any significant difference in tone or volume but as many have pointed out that's hard to determine between two different guitars. Personally, I love the look of a slope shouldered guitar. My Gibson J 45's, at least to me, are really fine looking guitars.
    '72 D 40
    '75 D 40 C
    '81 D 46
    '92 D 48
    '14 D 55
    '98 D 60
    '64 D 50 Braz. RW
    '86 D 66
    '81 D 70
    '96 DV 52
    '94 DV 72
    '94 DV 73
    '66 F 20
    '00 F 30R/'79 F 30
    '10 F 40 GSR Cocobolo
    '17 F 40
    '08 F 50R
    '09 F 50
    '97 F 65 CE
    'xx D 55-12
    '07 F 412 X 2
    '74 F 512
    xx F-612
    '83 G 45
    '87 GF 50R
    '95 JF 100 NAT CRV
    '14 000 Orpheum 12 fret
    '13&'14 Orpheum Jumbo
    '63 and '18 M 20
    '63 Baritone Uke
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  3. #13
    Super Moderator fronobulax's Avatar
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    Does either body shape make it easier to access frets above the 12th than the other? I'd guess not but considering the contortions needed on a non-cutaway one shape might be easier on the wrist.
    Quote Originally Posted by mgod View Post
    What he said.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuball48 View Post
    Frono: You are correct----again.

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  4. #14
    Seems a lot of folks like the slope shoulder design. Remember when you couldn't find a parlor guitar that wasn't a kid's beginner guitar. Now they are all over the place even the ones that aren'tr tryly parlors other than in name. There are a few slopes out there but not that many reasonably price ones that I am aware of other than Recording King, the Guild Memoir and the Blueridge which is on the higher side of the low (if there is such a thing) end.

  5. #15
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFIV1967 View Post
    Here's a bit of history: https://reverb.com/news/shoulder-to-...adnought-shape
    In general if you search on Google that topic was discussed in every guitar forum at some point in time...
    Ralf
    Great read, and I never really registered that Gibson actually called their dreads "Jumbos"...explains why John Lennon called his J160e a "jumbo".

    Quote Originally Posted by davismanLV View Post
    So keep your vitriol to yourself...
    But...but.... it's your favorite color!:

    (Copper sulphate is a sulphate salt of copper. It is also known as blue vitriol.)
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
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    All bought new!

  6. #16
    The biggest difference for me is comfort. The slope shoulder feels more compact to me. Plus its easy on the eyes :-)
    1965 Guild F30
    2012 Guild D55
    2017 Guild F55e SB
    2015 Gibson Sheryl Crow SJ
    2017 Gibson SJ200 SB
    2015 Taylor 214
    2009 Fender Strat
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  7. #17
    Senior Member davismanLV's Avatar
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    Well, Al, you know how I like blue. In my guitars and in my Copper sulphate as well!!! So, yeah.... isss true.
    Tom in Vegas

    Use the good china. Life itself is the special occasion.

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  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by fronobulax View Post
    Does either body shape make it easier to access frets above the 12th than the other? I'd guess not but considering the contortions needed on a non-cutaway one shape might be easier on the wrist.
    Gibson round-shoulders are almost all short-scale (24.75"), which might make a bit of a difference for some folks (Gibson & Epi AJs and the Epi Texan are 25.5").

    New this year is a J-45 Studio, with a slightly narrower body depth. A number of buyers have commented on how comfortable it is to play, along with having a very fine tone. Price is relatively easy on the wallet.

    Personally, I prefer Gibson roundshoulders, not only visually & for the short-scale, but also for the signature dry & woody tone you find on a good one. When fingerpicked, there's a somewhat percussive nature that's very addictive. As much as I enjoy my Guild & Martin dreads, if necessary they would go in a heartbeat, and the Gibsons would stay. That said, in order to find a good one, you need to have played a lot of them to know what the best ones are capable of. Of course, one could typically say that about any model from Guild, Gibson, or Martin.
    > Guilds: '73 F-30R / '74 F-40nt / '76 G-37bld / '92 D-6nt-hg / '94 JF-30nt / '97 Starfire III / '14 Savoy A-150b
    > Gibsons: '22 "A" Mandolin / '66 ES-125T / '66 Epi Cortez (B-25) / '90 Tennessean / '00 J-100xt / '02 J-45 RW / '02 SG / '07 CJ-165 / '09 ES-339 / '10 ES-330L / '11 ES-335 P90s / '12 ES-330 VOS / '12 LP Special / '12 J-185 / '13 LG-2 / '13 M.Kalamazoo / '14 J-15 / '15 J-50
    > Epis: '00 AIUSA Sheraton / '05 McCartney Texan / '09 Elitist Casino
    > Martins: '00 OOO-16 / '01 CS RW D

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by bobouz View Post
    Gibson round-shoulders are almost all short-scale (24.75"), which might make a bit of a difference for some folks (Gibson & Epi AJs and the Epi Texan are 25.5").

    New this year is a J-45 Studio, with a slightly narrower body depth. A number of buyers have commented on how comfortable it is to play, along with having a very fine tone. Price is relatively easy on the wallet.

    Personally, I prefer Gibson roundshoulders, not only visually & for the short-scale, but also for the signature dry & woody tone you find on a good one. When fingerpicked, there's a somewhat percussive nature that's very addictive. As much as I enjoy my Guild & Martin dreads, if necessary they would go in a heartbeat, and the Gibsons would stay. That said, in order to find a good one, you need to have played a lot of them to know what the best ones are capable of. Of course, one could typically say that about any model from Guild, Gibson, or Martin.
    Yep... +1
    1965 Guild F30
    2012 Guild D55
    2017 Guild F55e SB
    2015 Gibson Sheryl Crow SJ
    2017 Gibson SJ200 SB
    2015 Taylor 214
    2009 Fender Strat
    2015 Epi Les Paul Traditionnal

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