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Thread: Which Genre Is More Difficult to Learn

  1. #1
    Senior Member Rich Cohen's Avatar
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    Which Genre Is More Difficult to Learn

    Ok, LTGers, here's a mind bender:
    Which genre of music is more difficult to learn on the guitar, old timey, country, folk, blues, rock or jazz?

    I apologize in advance for asking the question.

    Al, I hereby propose you limit yourself to a maximum of 5,000 words.
    Rich
    Last edited by Rich Cohen; 02-03-2019 at 02:32 PM.
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  2. #2
    While all genres have their own challenges, I would have to say that jazz, by far, is the hardest. The number of different chord shapes and scales used far exceeds the other styles.

    Of course, of equal challenge, maybe, is one you didn’t list, which is classical.
    Chris

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Rich Cohen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AcornHouse View Post
    While all genres have their own challenges, I would have to say that jazz, by far, is the hardest. The number of different chord shapes and scales used far exceeds the other styles.

    Of course, of equal challenge, maybe, is one you didn’t list, which is classical.
    Thanks Chris for updating. I also forgot to splice jazz into gypsy jazz as well. I agree, and would add that jazz introduces one to the total fretboard.
    Guiilds:
    Hoboken archtops:1963 A-500 B, 1966 Artist Award SB

    Epiphones:
    1934 Royal (walnut back/sides) 1947 Broadway/DeArmond 1000, 1954 Zephyr Regent/ "New York" pup

    Amp:
    Rivera Jazz Suprema 55 Ruby, the ultimate jazz amp!

  4. #4
    Senior Member walrus's Avatar
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    I agree with Chris. I play a few "simple" jazz tunes but even in their simplicity they have some complex chords, lots of stretches and string muting. But fun!

    I play mostly rock/pop stuff - love the riffs that go with rock songs, but at least for me now, I'm not sure "difficult" would describe most of them, because that's what I've been playing for decades.

    And yes, classical is a whole separate category of difficulty, at least for me. Particularly as I am a flat picker...

    A caveat - I think it depends on what music you like. I have listened to rock and roll, The Beatles, Zeppelin, etc etc for years and greatly enjoy it, so of course I am more likely to learn those songs. But if I loved classical, I probably would have been spending all this time learning that kind of music, and I would own a classical guitar (Guild, of course!).

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  5. #5
    Jazz, exponentially. I've known jazz students who put five hours a day just into practicing scales. Someone clocked John Coltrane at a hundred chord changes a minute.

    But I also once read an interview with a jazz player who said he switched to it because country was too hard. We're all wired differently!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Cohen View Post
    Thanks Chris for updating. I also forgot to splice jazz into gypsy jazz as well. I agree, and would add that jazz introduces one to the total fretboard.
    If you're splicing, splice! There are dozens of jazz flavors - gypsy, swing, Dixieland, big band, hillbilly, bebop, free, acid, avant garde, soft, ragtime, Afro-Cuban, and lounge, just for openers.

    There was a radio station here in Maine that used to have a weekly hour-long Scandinavian jazz show. And it was great stuff. Like, who knew?

  7. #7
    Senior Member walrus's Avatar
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    I like the "generic" version of "jazz" for this discussion, otherwise Rich's complex and profound question is even more complex and profound!

    BTW, Charlie, everyone's different, but I would give up guitar if I had to practice scales five hours a day. Or even 1/2 hour. It's supposed to fun and relaxing!


    walrus
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  8. #8
    I'd say whichever style you are least familiar with, but starting from scratch as a new player, likely Classical, Jazz, and Metal... wait, wha? Metal? Yes Metal. Like the 2 other styles, there are dense layers of sub-genres, and many of the metal sub-genres have a lot in common with classical, including the chords and scales used. Then add the speed and precision necessary to execute the music. Of course, you can say that about many traditional folk styles from various countries around the world... I guess what I'm saying is that it's probably pretty subjective. Some things just click for people, others don't. So many variables! How about this? The hardest style to play is the one you least like that also requires the most practice and discipline. Multiply the effect if your parents are forcing you.. hahahaha.
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  9. #9
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    For me, it's anything that requires finger picking, flat picking or anything more than 5 basic chords. (maybe a bit exaggerated but not by much)
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Rich Cohen's Avatar
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    I like Richard's honesty, and his collection of Guilds.
    Alan_M gave us a good dose of wisdom.
    RC
    Guiilds:
    Hoboken archtops:1963 A-500 B, 1966 Artist Award SB

    Epiphones:
    1934 Royal (walnut back/sides) 1947 Broadway/DeArmond 1000, 1954 Zephyr Regent/ "New York" pup

    Amp:
    Rivera Jazz Suprema 55 Ruby, the ultimate jazz amp!

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