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Thread: Tim Pierce with his new M-80

  1. #1

    Tim Pierce with his new M-80

    Session man Tim Pierce picked up a Guild M-80 at Norman’s.

    Chris

    56 A-50, '57 CE-100, ‘58 A-350, '60 X-150, ‘60 SF II, '61 M-20, '62 F-20, '64 S-50 Jetstar, '64 Mark II, '65 SFIV, '71 S-90, '75 F-112, '75 Mark IVp, '81 M-80, '82 S-275, ‘87 Nightbird I, '88 Detonator, ‘92 F-15ce, '93 X-500, '97 Bluesbird, '99 F-30, ‘14 NS Aristocrat, '16 NS T-bird
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  2. #2
    great tone he has with that guild!
    Wood

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  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    He has so much processing going on that its hard to say "Its all in the fingers" here, but this guy is obviously a killer player. Thanks for posting this!

    Of special note to me is the Vox AC-50 (behind him), which has been removed from its case and set upwards...maybe its an AC-100 to cool so it doesn't light up?
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  4. #4
    Senior Member walrus's Avatar
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    Great video! He can definitely play!

    I can't believe he's got that M-80 on his leg - those things are heavy!

    walrus
    2011 Guild F-30RCE
    2008 PRS Hollowbody Spruce

  5. #5
    Senior Member SFIV1967's Avatar
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    Cool. He played that M-80 at Norm's already in August 2017!

    http://letstalkguild.com/ltg/showthr...835-Guild-M-80

    Ralf
    Last edited by SFIV1967; 01-10-2019 at 05:08 PM.

  6. #6
    Looks like a huge stop-tail on that M-80. "What this guitar needs is more mass!"

    -Dave-
    1962 F-20 Troubadour
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    c. 1971 Foxey Lady

  7. #7
    Senior Member SFIV1967's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum Strummer View Post
    Looks like a huge stop-tail on that M-80.
    It's the normal M-80 stoptail piece. But somebody mounted probably a wooden shim under it to get it higher up and hence get lower string tension.
    Ralf

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by SFIV1967 View Post
    It's the normal M-80 stoptail piece. But somebody mounted probably a wooden shim under it to get it higher up and hence get lower string tension.
    Ralf

    Hello

    Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    "Lower string tension"
    - If we talk the tension between saddle and nut, then tha wood block has absolutely nothing to do with it.

    String tension between a distance "X" on a string with cauge "Y" is constant regardless of what is outside support points - in this case bridge and nut.

    - If we talk of the string pressure on bridge/saddle - then it affects it.
    First good guitar - GUILD Duane Eddy 400 - I was 3rd owner - still regret letting it go 25 years ago - used to have Artist Award and Starfire - no regrets here.
    Present guitars - all bought new - F50R 1975 - F512 1977 - F212CSB 1979 - OM-240CE 2018 - Schecter Startocaster
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  9. #9
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuuska View Post
    Hello

    Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    "Lower string tension"
    - If we talk the tension between saddle and nut, then tha wood block has absolutely nothing to do with it.
    Hmmm, now that you mention it, I wonder if Ralph meant to say or imply something else?
    In the case of solid body electrics, pressure on the saddle(s) is irrelevant to "driving the top", perhaps he was trying to describe that strings with a flatter angle over the saddles would be easier to bend?
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuuska View Post
    String tension between a distance "X" on a string with cauge "Y" is constant regardless of what is outside support points - in this case bridge and nut.-
    Hair splitting on my part perhaps, but shouldn't this read:
    "At a given pitch and for a given material, string tension for length (better term than "distance" for this purpose) "X" on a string with gauge "Y" is constant regardless of what is outside support points"
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuuska View Post
    If we talk of the string pressure on bridge/saddle - then it affects it.
    Right, because the saddle is the fulcrum of a lever created by the string between the saddle and the pin or anchor point (stoptail) and the break angle determines the force multiplication the lever is applying at the fulcrum.
    Last edited by adorshki; 01-11-2019 at 04:44 PM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
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    All bought new!

  10. #10
    Senior Member SFIV1967's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    ... perhaps he was trying to describe that strings with a flatter angle over the saddles would be easier to bend?
    Yes, I guess that is what I tried saying. It's the same as people use wraparound tailpieces on Les Pauls and Bluesbirds. Nuuska is right, it has nothing to do with string tension in theory, but by adding the wooden block the tailpiece is still tightly fixed to the body but is lifted in a way a stoptailpiece would be lifted of the body to achieve less string break angle. And less string angle first can mean less broken strings when bending a lot and it can give a more "slinky" feeling. The reduced break angle will make fretting feel easier and bends easier, but the distance needed to bend to a specific pitch will now be greater.
    Ralf

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