Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 26 of 26

Thread: Flame

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by walrus View Post
    I had a Gibson ES-339 for about a week - bought at Guitar Center, so easy return. Love the size and feel of the guitar, but those "nibs" drove me crazy! I kept sliding off the high E string off the edge.

    If anyone cares, here's a great article about them, how they are made, etc., and why they are not as popular as Gibson hoped:

    https://hazeguitars.com/blog/the-gre...ret-nib-debate

    walrus
    It was never about thinking they would be popular, its all about ease of manufacture. When fretting a bound neck the correct way, you need to grind off the tang where the frets will go over the bindings, which is a larger labor expense. The Gibson way is just cheaper to do, since they don't have to do any tang grinding. And, as the article say, they're a PITA if you have to refret them (or play on them.)
    Chris

    56 A-50, '57 CE-100, '60 X-150, '61 M-20, '62 F-20, '64 S-50 Jetstar, '64 Mark II, '65 SFIV, '71 S-90, '75 F-112, '75 Mark IVp, '81 M-80, '82 S-275, 87 Nightbird I, '88 Detonator, 92 F-15ce, '93 X-500, '97 Bluesbird, '99 F-30, '16 NS S-200 T-bird, M-75 Aristocrat
    '54 Masteramp, '60 99j, '63 200-S, '66 Thunderbass, 66 Thunder T1-12, '69 Thunderstar, 93 Sequoia,
    60s Baritone Uke

    '03 Elder Lute
    http://acornhouseworkshop.com/
    '08 Parlor, '10 Butternut Deuce, '13 Rounder, '14 Kulakeiki

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbesickles View Post
    Kakerlak,

    I saw a nice looking '05 R8 on the Dallas Craigslist for $2500 with all case candy and CoA. Pickups were changed though.
    This one, I assume: https://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/ms...723006086.html That's not a bad deal, honestly, and the replacement pickups should be an improvement. Wish I had the money, ha ha!

    '66 Starfire XII (sunburst) SOLD
    '71 S-100 (natural) SOLD
    '74 Starfire VI (walnut/mahogany body) TRADED
    '94 X-700 (natural)

  3. #23
    Senior Member walrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    11,652
    Quote Originally Posted by AcornHouse View Post
    It was never about thinking they would be popular, its all about ease of manufacture. When fretting a bound neck the correct way, you need to grind off the tang where the frets will go over the bindings, which is a larger labor expense. The Gibson way is just cheaper to do, since they don't have to do any tang grinding. And, as the article say, they're a PITA if you have to refret them (or play on them.)
    Thanks for that insight, Chris!

    walrus
    1984 Guild D64
    2008 PRS Hollowbody Spruce

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by AcornHouse View Post
    It was never about thinking they would be popular, its all about ease of manufacture. When fretting a bound neck the correct way, you need to grind off the tang where the frets will go over the bindings, which is a larger labor expense. The Gibson way is just cheaper to do, since they don't have to do any tang grinding. And, as the article say, they're a PITA if you have to refret them (or play on them.)
    Forgive my luthier ignorance here. It seems in my uneducated mind that removing material in 20+places on both sides of the binding would also be labor intensive. Is it that much easier than removing the back sides of the frets?

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by amnicon View Post
    Forgive my luthier ignorance here. It seems in my uneducated mind that removing material in 20+places on both sides of the binding would also be labor intensive. Is it that much easier than removing the back sides of the frets?
    Yes, because it’s easy to automate removing plastic following the contour of the fingerboard and frets. They fret the fingerboard, using a long roll of fret wire, only making one cut per fret; sand down the fret ends flush, then glue on the binding and machine the binding down to the surface of the board and frets. It’s not a very skill dependent method.

    To do it the correct way, each fret must be cut first to rough size, then the tangs are ground down with a file, Dremel, or cut with a nipper. Then the fret is hammered or pressed in over the already installed binding and cut flush, then beveled with a file. It’s a lot more skilled handwork.

    By the way, that’s why stainless steel frets cost so much more. It’s so hard, that the tools to do all of the above don’t last too long.
    Chris

    56 A-50, '57 CE-100, '60 X-150, '61 M-20, '62 F-20, '64 S-50 Jetstar, '64 Mark II, '65 SFIV, '71 S-90, '75 F-112, '75 Mark IVp, '81 M-80, '82 S-275, 87 Nightbird I, '88 Detonator, 92 F-15ce, '93 X-500, '97 Bluesbird, '99 F-30, '16 NS S-200 T-bird, M-75 Aristocrat
    '54 Masteramp, '60 99j, '63 200-S, '66 Thunderbass, 66 Thunder T1-12, '69 Thunderstar, 93 Sequoia,
    60s Baritone Uke

    '03 Elder Lute
    http://acornhouseworkshop.com/
    '08 Parlor, '10 Butternut Deuce, '13 Rounder, '14 Kulakeiki

  6. #26
    AcornHouse, got it. Thanks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •