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Thread: Timely Artice re humidity

  1. #1

    Timely Artice re humidity

    built like Meatloaf but Sings like Diana Ross: Antney

    my favorite age people to be around are those under 7 and over 70 because you always get the truth: Stuball


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  2. #2
    I do need to have another meter thanks for
    the link ;)

    I知 running about 30% I also need another humidifier. The humility changes are not drastic swings so I知 thankful for that . 😁

  3. #3
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayk View Post
    The humility changes are not drastic swings so I知 thankful for that . ��
    Ray if you've got one saving grace it's humility.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    Ray if you've got one saving grace it's humility.
    Lol I just seen that haha dang auto correct but I値l take as I have no idea what the word would of looked like with out it . Hehehehe

  5. #5
    Ya just can't slip up here, and I like that LTG correct.

    Ralph

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by F312 View Post
    Ya just can't slip up here, and I like that LTG correct.

    Ralph
    Yup and I知 hear to kept ya on your tees ;) 😜

  7. #7
    Senior Member gjmalcyon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayk View Post
    I do need to have another meter thanks for
    the link ;)

    I’m running about 30% I also need another humidifier. The humility changes are not drastic swings so I’m thankful for that . ��
    So, where can I buy a humilifier? My wife and kids certainly believe I could use one....
    '69 Yamaha FG-110 (folks)
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    '72 F-212XL (ex-idealassets - with a nephew)
    '83 D-35 (ex-Walking Man, ex-Qvart)
    '93 JF4-12 (ex-grumpyguybill)
    '07 F-47R (ex-mikemo6string)
    '74 G-37 (ex-Gardman, ex-Neal)
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    GAD D125-12 (ex-BoneDigger)
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    '99 DeArmond M-75
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  8. #8
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    I always wonder about humidity, since my guitars are very old and I assume that at many points in their lives all the moisture has been sucked out of their fibers leaving a stable substrate of solid dry old growth wood. I wouldn't F with that by trying to hydrate and risk changing that stability. They're good to go every day and rarely, if ever, develop cracks.

  9. #9
    Dried out guitars do not become "...a stable substrate of solid dry old growth wood..." because they are not one piece of wood, nor does their gran run in parrallel directions, and there is also glue involved. If a guitar was like a log, and were given enoug time to dry out at a controlled rate, then your statement may have been somewhat correct. However,guitars generally have some parts working contrary to other parts. The topw wood runs parallel to the length of the guitar. The X braces below the top run at an angle The back and side woods are usually different species (hardwood), and will shrink at a different rate than the top wood (usually a softwood). The shrinking of the wood also puts stress on glue joints due to the various directions and rates that the different woods are shrinking at.

    Put a guitar into a situation where the ambient humidity is at say 15%, I don't care how old the guitar is, it will develop top cracks. See how many top cracks are repaired every year in areas that have indoor heating during the winter. In the case where cracks don't develop, you will often see the curve/arch of the top decrease, creating action problems (too low in this type of situation( causing buzzing and decreased volume and tonal quality.
    _____________________________________
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  10. #10
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jedzep View Post
    I always wonder about humidity, since my guitars are very old and I assume that at many points in their lives all the moisture has been sucked out of their fibers leaving a stable substrate of solid dry old growth wood. I wouldn't F with that by trying to hydrate and risk changing that stability. They're good to go every day and rarely, if ever, develop cracks.
    Kostas made good points but underlying reason all those problems can occur is this:
    ALL (untreated and unsealed) wood is hygroscopic, that is, it absorbs ambient humidity and in fact will absorb it right up until it can absorb no more or it reaches equilibrium with the ambient humidity.
    By the same token it will also give up its residual moisture when RH is low enough for osmosis to takes over, that's the tendency of all molecules to move from areas of greater concentration to areas of lesser concentration. (Which is the basis of the hygroscopic nature of wood). So if the ambient air's drier than the wood the guitar gives up its moisture content.
    I think he knows that but if you didn't you may have still failed to grasp the why of it all.
    Too much humidity is also not desirable for guitar as it will cause swelling which leads to similar problems as shrinkage when it come to pushing glue joints out of alignment or other distortions.
    That's why there's an ideal humidity range defined for guitars of anywhere from 35% at low end to 55% at high end and depending on who you ask.
    Within those limits virtually any guitar will retain its ideal dimensions and not suffer from distortion-causing swelling or shrinkage-induced cracks.
    I suspect the reason your guitars have been so stable is simply that like me, you're fortunate enough to live in an area where ideal humidity range prevails for the vast majority of the year.
    Cold air is inherently less capable of holding moisture than warm air and heating it dries it further, thus the annual reminders to members to start humidifying, "where necessary".
    Other factors, such as construction, come into play with guitars as well : laminated tops, sides, and backs are inherently swell-and-crack resistant.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

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