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Thread: Guild Guitar recommendation for children beginning lessons

  1. #11
    Senior Member poser's Avatar
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    I don't think nylon strings are any easier on the fingers that steel strings. I started playing with nylon strings and got blisters on my fingers just the same. You can always lower some of the tension on the strings by using them a little below concert pitch.

  2. #12
    Senior Member dreadnut's Avatar
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    I would recommend silk & steel strings, they are very easy on the fingers. (unlike my first guitar which was like telephone cables on a two-by-four, LOL)

    I think it is crucial to build early success into his lesson plan; I like to send my students home playing a song the first week, even if it is just a one string song or an open tuning thing, kids and adults alike.
    "The air's as still as the throttle on a funeral train." John Prine

    '76 D-25M
    '99 DV-52ABHG
    '98 DeArmond Starfire Special
    Takamine Acoustic Flying "A"
    Crate CA-125D Acoustic Amp
    Fishman Loudbox Mini Acoustic Amp

  3. #13
    just an additional suggestion/opinion I would consider the GAD/Westerlycollection/M-120, small body and short (but full) scale. This is a professional model (yes even the Asian one), but would still work for a first grader, I would guess. An easy re-sell later, popular and standard model. there is a nice looking Cherry one on Reverb now for 559 or best offer. has a gig bag or hard foam case. not sure of electronics or not. looks to have the MIRC refurb sticker over the serial number. In my experience that basicaly means the guitar was unsold inventoty, went to a 3rd party where it is was set up recently and has no warranty,but should be essentially brand new. possibly a customer return. the cherry red Guild acoustics seem to be getting more popular. this is just an import in poly but still is pretty. no affiliation, etc. make a hot black friday offer!! bwahaha https://reverb.com/item/6897455-guild-m120-cherry-red

  4. #14
    Getting lots of great suggestions and needed information. The grandson still has 7 months of piano lessons before he can try guitar. His parents told him a year of piano and if he wanted to try a different instrument that would be fine but no quitting piano until a years worth of lessons. I am pretty sure his parents will ask my opinion on guitar and with your advice I will be able to offer excellent advice or say, "I have an extra one that would be just fine" and give him the one I bought based on your replies.
    1962 Epiphone Century Cherry Hollow Body Arch Top E422T
    1993 Guild DV52 NT
    2003 Epiphone Masterbilt AJ500 MANNH

  5. #15
    Super Moderator chazmo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mavuser View Post
    just an additional suggestion/opinion I would consider the GAD/Westerlycollection/M-120, small body and short (but full) scale. This is a professional model (yes even the Asian one), but would still work for a first grader, I would guess. An easy re-sell later, popular and standard model. there is a nice looking Cherry one on Reverb now for 559 or best offer. has a gig bag or hard foam case. not sure of electronics or not. looks to have the MIRC refurb sticker over the serial number. In my experience that basicaly means the guitar was unsold inventoty, went to a 3rd party where it is was set up recently and has no warranty,but should be essentially brand new. possibly a customer return. the cherry red Guild acoustics seem to be getting more popular. this is just an import in poly but still is pretty. no affiliation, etc. make a hot black friday offer!! bwahaha https://reverb.com/item/6897455-guild-m120-cherry-red
    I think this is an outstanding idea.

    Dread, I'm glad you had luck with that First Act guitar, but I had bad luck with an electric that I bought as a starter kit for my kids. It was a big mistake (and a serious piece of junk).

    Anyway, good luck in the hunt, Stu. I am a big fan of getting nice instruments for youth players to get them (and keep them) interested.
    Quote Originally Posted by Neal
    I am going to hang onto this little F-20 and play it as a reminder that life is sometimes rough, but it doesn't necessarily mean that the damage you accrue along the way defines who you are.
    Quote Originally Posted by marcellis
    Growing old is a bitch.
    Guild 12-strings:
    1978 G-312NT (Westerly) - "Franzz",
    1994 JF-30-12Bld (Westerly),
    2006 F-512 (Tacoma),
    2010 F-212XL STD (New Hartford) - "Connie"
    2014 Orpheum 12 OOO SHRW (New Hartford)

    Non-Guild 12s:
    1970 Martin D-12-20
    1980 Ibanez AW-75 (Series I)
    1984 Taylor 655

  6. #16
    Senior Member dreadnut's Avatar
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    Stu, my Mom had me take piano lessons when I was young and I hated it. My piano teacher took my Mom aside one day and told her "You're wasting your money; he won't learn to read music."

    She got me my first guitar a few years later, and I've been playing (by ear) for almost 50 years now...
    "The air's as still as the throttle on a funeral train." John Prine

    '76 D-25M
    '99 DV-52ABHG
    '98 DeArmond Starfire Special
    Takamine Acoustic Flying "A"
    Crate CA-125D Acoustic Amp
    Fishman Loudbox Mini Acoustic Amp

  7. #17
    Dreadnut:
    Great story and always thought people who could play by ear "felt" the notes instead of just seeing the notes. I realize there are those who can do both. I know I would enjoy your playing.

  8. #18
    Agree with the jr jumbo and silk and steel strings...the short scale and narrow nut is more accommodating for small kids hands...nylon/classical fingerboards are wider...and longer scale...full scale doesn't work for kids...they can't handle the spacing on the lower frets.

    Meanwhile, you could get the kid an ukulele...the size that's tuned like the 4 high strings on the guitar...with an easy kids beginner book with pictures...he can learn to hold it, develop some hand strength, and ease thru the beginners sore fingers until he/his parents are ready to give him guitar lessons...no reason he can't learn a second instrument while taking piano...all music is related...and maybe he won't hate his piano lessons so much if he can look forward to playing with the ukulele after practice.

    Above all, make it fun for the kid.

    Hint: holidays are coming.
    Last edited by GuildFS4612CE; 11-13-2017 at 10:00 PM.

  9. #19
    Senior Member dreadnut's Avatar
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    Almost hate to suggest it, but Epiphone LP's are cheap, and easy for a kid to play. That's what I started my son on, and he transitioned to acoustic easily when he got a little bigger.
    Last edited by dreadnut; 11-14-2017 at 12:21 AM.
    "The air's as still as the throttle on a funeral train." John Prine

    '76 D-25M
    '99 DV-52ABHG
    '98 DeArmond Starfire Special
    Takamine Acoustic Flying "A"
    Crate CA-125D Acoustic Amp
    Fishman Loudbox Mini Acoustic Amp

  10. #20
    Senior Member jp's Avatar
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    Although classical strings are easy on the fingers, I think the wide fret board and high string height of classicals are more difficult to fret for younger beginners.
    1959 T-100 DP
    1968 CE-100 DP
    1976 BluesBird M-75

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