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Thread: Cleaning hazy/cloudy D4 NT

  1. #11
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davismanLV View Post
    p.s. - Al that's good advice. You can still play the guitar but don't put your sweaty disgusting arms on it.... without long sleeves!!
    Long sleeves not an option for me, just can't stand the slightest binding on arms when playing. I move 'em around too much.
    Won't even wear a watch on the fretting hand.
    Quote Originally Posted by davismanLV View Post
    LMAO!! And also, you could reacquaint yourself with that lovely F65ce..... Do you have an amp for that puppy, bro?
    If memory serves (I think the sweat damage story actually happened around 2005 or 6), I hadn't quite figured out how to play the F65ce yet but it was a good excuse to start putting playing time on the '40, which was still the sonic runt of the litter at the time.
    And it might well have been when I finally started learning "how to actually play the F65ce".
    The size and shape was such a radical departure from the dreads that I think I finally saw the light late one night after giving the '40 a workout and was a bit tired but still "in the mood".
    I realized it was responding better to a much more delicate touch than the dreads.
    At the same time I realized I should put the extra lights back on it as I'd strung it with .012's shortly after I bought it.
    I do have a Crate 20w amp but I think I've only plugged in twice. I'm just too effin' lazy to haul it out of closet when I know I have to put it away again afterwards.
    Besides the apartment not bein' the ideal place for a guitar amp.
    The bridge lift on it's finally getting to be bad enough to require repair. The gap's about the thickness of a business card on the treble side now, and the straightedge lines up perfectly with the bridge on the bass side but comes above the bridge on the treble.
    I'd been holding out for a local warranty repair but suspect Cordoba'll shirk the request.
    Or if they want me to ship it it wouldnt be worth it anyway, besides the shipping risk.
    Also I've realized it might be a little more complicated than a simple R&R of the bridge because of the UST.
    I have no idea how easy (or not) that's gonna be to "work around".
    Suspect it's probably wired right to the preamp and may require soldering as opposed to an actual easy disconnect connector.
    Guess I'm gonna have to "dig into it" sometime soon here.
    Given my druthers I'd deliver it to the luthier with the UST already disconnected but ready to re-install. IF I'm sure I can do it.
    Working space both in my apartment AND in the guitar is the primary complication, there.
    I know how to use a soldering iron.
    Last edited by adorshki; 08-18-2017 at 07:47 PM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  2. #12
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    SERGIO:
    Apologies for the digressions, didn't intend to "Hijack" your thread, it's just something that's pretty common here as we explore issues related to an original question.
    I want to mention that Davisman's got a lot of professional woodworking experience so his input about naptha and finishes in general is VERY credible.
    Hope it all helps!
    Last edited by adorshki; 08-18-2017 at 07:48 PM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  3. #13
    The surface of the finish:
    To the OP: Others have rightly advised you to begin by ensuring the finish is clean.

    If this were a gloss finish (added for others who may read this thread, one day), it is not uncommon to see a player rest a chin or face cheek on the upper bout, right at the crest of the bend. When I see an otherwise glossy guitar with a dull (aka "hazy") finish in this location, chin or cheek contact is the first thing I suspect (similar to the crest of the bend on the lower bout, where a bare arm lays against the finish). Others have mentioned the body sweat that gets transferred, creating build up or interacting with and dulling the finish. This can be more complicated to resolve, if the finish is actually damaged, chemically.

    There is an additional possibility, and that is if the chin or cheek contains whiskers you can actually abrade the gloss finish, resulting in a dull, hazy appearance. Under most circumstances (unless the composition of the finish has be compromised) the micro-scratches can be buffed out and the finish restored to a shine.

    However, you have a satin, not gloss, finish and you mention hazy and cloudy. Would the word milky apply? If so...

    Beneath the surface:
    As kostask indicated in an earlier post referencing a neck reset, a condition known as blushing can occur where moisture is trapped under the finish or between layers of finish. Wedged right in between waiting for the moisture to disappear and applying polish over the top of it, I hesitantly suggest another step: chemically dry the moisture. Stewart Macdonald sells an aerosol product called Blush Eraser that does a good job of drying the moisture (*if* that is the problem). This product is only recommended for use with a NitroCellulose Lacquer finish.
    Last edited by Christopher Cozad; 08-19-2017 at 12:45 AM. Reason: Clearing up who I am talking to...Thanks Al.
    - Christopher

    1975 F-212 NT (overhaul started in 2016)
    1975 F-212 NT
    1976 F-50R NT
    1976 F-512 NT (Overhauled in 2010)
    1980 F-412 NT (Overhauled in 2014)
    1988 (G)F-60R NT

    Diagnosed in childhood with a CLWEA genetic predisposition
    CLWEA is an acronym for Can't Leave Well Enough Alone

  4. #14
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Cozad View Post
    The surface of the finish:
    Stewart Macdonald sells an aerosol product called Blush Eraser that does a good job of drying the moisture (*if* that is the problem, and *if* you are dealing with a NitroCellulose Lacquer finish).
    Assuming this is the original finish (and it was the standard on early D4's), it's definitely a nitrocellulose finish but was applied by hand in a gel form rather than lacquer-sprayed form, why they called it "Hand-Rubbed".
    Mentioned for confirmation but I realize you may also have been making those points for future readers with different guitars, per your preamble.
    Last edited by adorshki; 08-19-2017 at 12:29 AM.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  5. #15
    Late to the party, but this stuff _is_ magic for humid conditions:

    http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and...SABEgIAjvD_BwE
    1958 CE-100 Capri
    1966 F-20
    1988 D15
    1994 F4CE
    1996 F4CE Sick puppy
    2000 DCE5
    Several assorted DeArmonds
    The odd Epi
    A Dorado resonator

  6. #16
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    And after all this I realized any replies our new member's made might well be awaiting the standard moderator's review of new member posts before showing up, and nobody's explained that yet.
    Sergio, I'd bet any replies you've made will pop up over the weekend and from then on they should post in real time .
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  7. #17
    Thanks to everyone for the replies! I'm leaning towards cleaning and polishing using either the Meguiers or Virtuoso cleaner and Polish. It won't bother me if I end up polishing, as long as you can see the mahogany grain underneath.

  8. #18
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Balderas_sergio87 View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the replies! I'm leaning towards cleaning and polishing using either the Meguiers or Virtuoso cleaner and Polish. It won't bother me if I end up polishing, as long as you can see the mahogany grain underneath.
    Just be aware that the that you could wind up with an uneven finish if you use the Meguiers since it's actually a polish.
    It's designed to cut a little bit.
    The more rubbing you do the more gloss will be brought out on the satin finish.
    The other thing to bear in mind is that it's going to be very tough to get an even gloss all the way to the edges of the fretboard and bridge, if that's what you're thinking of doing.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

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