Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 63

Thread: Unplugged sound in an electric guitar

  1. #21
    Originally Posted by Neal Speaking of strings, I tried out acoustic strings (PB lights) on the ~53 X-150 I recently acquired. It sounded pretty good as an acoustic instrument, despite the pickup mounted on the laminated spruce top.

    It sounded horrible when I plugged it in, however. Turns out that you can't have it both ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by Westerly Wood View Post
    Interesting. I wonder how Nickel acoustic strings would fare on electric plugged in.
    To use a mag PUP with acoustic strings, you need a PUP that is voiced for acoustic...the laws of physics apply to string materials/mass vs. PUP. Since my FS4612CE...with both a UST and Mag PUP...both thoroughly antiquated...is essentially an ELECTRIC guitar...I.E. you need to amplify it...I use ELECTRIC strings...the transducer picks up VIBRATIONS...and doesn't much care if the strings are steel or nickel or bronze...but the old PUP needs the electric strings...possibly a new modern PUP voiced for acoustic would change that...but for now, just like it is, works.

  2. #22
    GAD: Good analysis. And you hit the nail on the head when you make the distinction between the different levels of scrutiny each player goes through when considering buying a guitar.

    I never was (and probably never will be ) a guitar tech, so I pretty much focus on the end result only when considering an instrument, which for an electric guitar is how it feels/sounds plugged in.

    Once again, how boring would the world be if we all acted / thought the same way? :)

    PS: Nice Strat... and the right one for me: It has the rosewood fingerboard! lol
    D25BR 1972
    DV72 1994
    F212 1975
    S100 1973
    S100 1974 (carved)
    Starfire IV 1966
    X175 1978
    Jetstar 1974

    Quote Originally Posted by fronobulax View Post
    In this world there are always those who march to the sound of a different drummer. These wayward marchers go off and break boundaries. Blistering leads on an acoustic. Purple spandex, and proud of it. Gibsons on a Guild forum. But the world is a better place for their pioneering efforts.

  3. #23
    Senior Member davismanLV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    U.S.A. : Nevada : Las Vegas
    Posts
    8,669
    I've only ever played electrics unplugged. Have I been doing it wrong? LOL!!
    Tom in Vegas

    Use the good china. Life itself is the special occasion.

    Guild D65s, 1994
    Guild DV72, 1994
    Taylor GC8, 2011
    Washburn EA-20 "Festival Series", 1995

  4. #24
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sillycon Valley CA
    Posts
    18,845
    Quote Originally Posted by fronobulax View Post
    I used to think that way - who cares what the wood is because the pickup only gets the string vibrations? I have become convinced otherwise.
    And the first thing I think of is that Artist Awards are built to sound good acoustically and that the floating pickups were used so as not to inhibit the top's resonance at all.
    In their original form, electrics HAD to sound good acoustically and the amp was just there to up the volume as needed.
    But it is primarily a hollow and chambered-body issue, I wouldn't expect a solid-body's unplugged sound to be a good indicator of its plugged-in capabilities.
    Remember we didn't even have solid-bodies until Les Paul got a wild idea and put pickups on a plank..
    Quote Originally Posted by fronobulax View Post
    The wood in an electric definitely effects sustain which effects tone because the overtones decay differently and it turns out that some pickups actually pickup vibration from things besides the strings.
    I suspect rather that the strings ARE vibrating differently according to what they're strung on.
    Overtones are generated by the strings themselves, although granted their sustain is affected by the materials and construction of the instrument whether solid or hollow.
    But you may very well know something I don't about pickups and whether they actually pickup "vibrations" (resonant frequencies) as opposed to the simple fluctuation of the magnetic field as it's affected by the strings.
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    3,459
    The Franz pickups from the '50's and early '60's seem to capture far more than string vibration. They appear to be microphonic, to some extent, unlike the more modern archtops I have owned. More like a K&K on an acoustic guitar.
    Neal

    '53 "X-150" Redburst
    '54 X-50 SB
    '54 X-200-S SB
    '71 F-20 NT ("Tonya")
    '71 D-25 BR
    '73 D-35 NT
    '81 D-212 SB
    '05 F-50R NT
    '12 F-50 STD SB




    Others: '59 Gretsch Clipper, '74 Dobro Round-Neck Resonator (wood), '77 Dobro Squareneck Resonator (bell brass), '87 Dobro Square-Neck Resonator (wood), '07 Rockbridge Adi/Mahogany dreadnought, '09 Huss and Dalton TD-M Custom dreadnought, Tele Partscaster.

  6. #26
    I enjoy playing both of my M-75s unplugged. Being hollow they're quite loud & ringy for electric guitars. In general I go for electrics, even solidbodies, that have good acoustic character. This has never steered me wrong in cases where I've bought one without plugging it in first. Still, plenty of inert-sounding electrics—when played acoustically—come alive and sound great when plugged in.

    I've often recorded my Rickie 360 unplugged, usually doubling an electric rhythm part. It adds snap without sounding obviously "acoustic."

    -Dave-
    1962 F-20 Troubadour
    1970 M-75 Bluesbird
    1971 S-100 "Black Cherry"
    1973 S-100 "Nature Boy"
    1990 Nightbird Custom
    2013 NS M-75 Aristocrat
    2016 NS S-200 Thunderbird

    c. 1971 Foxey Lady

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by bluesypicky View Post
    GAD: Good analysis. And you hit the nail on the head when you make the distinction between the different levels of scrutiny each player goes through when considering buying a guitar.

    I never was (and probably never will be ) a guitar tech, so I pretty much focus on the end result only when considering an instrument, which for an electric guitar is how it feels/sounds plugged in.

    Once again, how boring would the world be if we all acted / thought the same way? :)

    PS: Nice Strat... and the right one for me: It has the rosewood fingerboard! lol
    Thanks! I dislike maple-board guitars. A lot. They just feel so wrong to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by davismanLV View Post
    I've only ever played electrics unplugged. Have I been doing it wrong? LOL!!
    LOL. You need one of these:



    Disclaimer: don't do that.

    Quote Originally Posted by adorshki View Post
    And the first thing I think of is that Artist Awards are built to sound good acoustically and that the floating pickups were used so as not to inhibit the top's resonance at all.
    In their original form, electrics HAD to sound good acoustically and the amp was just there to up the volume as needed.
    But it is primarily a hollow and chambered-body issue, I wouldn't expect a solid-body's unplugged sound to be a good indicator of its plugged-in capabilities.
    Remember we didn't even have solid-bodies until Les Paul got a wild idea and put pickups on a plank..

    I suspect rather that the strings ARE vibrating differently according to what they're strung on.
    Overtones are generated by the strings themselves, although granted their sustain is affected by the materials and construction of the instrument whether solid or hollow.
    But you may very well know something I don't about pickups and whether they actually pickup "vibrations" (resonant frequencies) as opposed to the simple fluctuation of the magnetic field as it's affected by the strings.
    Pickups actually produce voltage based on the changing velocity of the strings according to Faraday's Law of electromagnetic induction. There's a cool animated gif of the principle somewhere but I can't find it at the moment. Edit - found it: https://nationalmaglab.org/education.../guitar-pickup

    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    The Franz pickups from the '50's and early '60's seem to capture far more than string vibration. They appear to be microphonic, to some extent, unlike the more modern archtops I have owned. More like a K&K on an acoustic guitar.
    I believe all pickups are microphonic to some degree. On older pickups where the winding may be looser, there's more vibration possible which leads to more microphonics. Plenty of people consider this to be a good thing which is why not all pickups are wax potted. Sadly, the term "microphonic" has come to mean "bad" because of pickups that squeal and tubes that do bad things, but as you've noted, it could be part of the magic in older pickups.
    1970s: [ S70 ]
    1980s: [ X79-3 | 2x X80 | S270 | S281 | 2x S284 | S300 | S300A-D | Detonator | 2x Nightbird | Liberator Elite ]
    1990s: [ 2x S100 | X170 | X170T | SB602F | SF IV |Bluesbird ]
    2000s: [ SF III-90 | SF IV | BB-90 ]
    2010s:
    [ NS BB ]
    Amps: [ G300 | G600 ]

    My Blogs: GADsGuilds.com | Blog | Cozy Tales

  8. #28
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sillycon Valley CA
    Posts
    18,845
    Quote Originally Posted by GAD View Post
    Pickups actually produce voltage based on the changing velocity of the strings according to Faraday's Law of electromagnetic induction. There's a cool animated gif of the principle somewhere but I can't find it at the moment. Edit - found it: https://nationalmaglab.org/education.../guitar-pickup
    Yeah I worded that poorly, just was focused on the magnetic part of the process (taking for granted everyone here knows that the fluctuation in the field changes the output of the coil, and why inductance is a better measure of a coil's characteristics than resistance), not seeing how plain old vibration would play a part.

    Quote Originally Posted by GAD View Post
    I believe all pickups are microphonic to some degree. On older pickups where the winding may be looser, there's more vibration possible which leads to more microphonics. Plenty of people consider this to be a good thing which is why not all pickups are wax potted. Sadly, the term "microphonic" has come to mean "bad" because of pickups that squeal and tubes that do bad things, but as you've noted, it could be part of the magic in older pickups.
    A-HA. I did learn something, forgot about the microphonic principle. (and I agree, "microphonic" isn't neccessarily a "bad" thing" )
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    3,459
    As far as the Franz pickups are concerned, "microphonic" is meant as a term of endearment.
    Last edited by Neal; 01-12-2017 at 03:30 AM.
    Neal

    '53 "X-150" Redburst
    '54 X-50 SB
    '54 X-200-S SB
    '71 F-20 NT ("Tonya")
    '71 D-25 BR
    '73 D-35 NT
    '81 D-212 SB
    '05 F-50R NT
    '12 F-50 STD SB




    Others: '59 Gretsch Clipper, '74 Dobro Round-Neck Resonator (wood), '77 Dobro Squareneck Resonator (bell brass), '87 Dobro Square-Neck Resonator (wood), '07 Rockbridge Adi/Mahogany dreadnought, '09 Huss and Dalton TD-M Custom dreadnought, Tele Partscaster.

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,477
    Thanks! I dislike maple-board guitars. A lot. They just feel so wrong to me.
    On the other hand, I like the maple fretboard on my G&L. It feels faster and seems to allow bends easier. And...I think it looks COOL on a strat type guitar.
    1974 Ovation Legend
    Walden G2070
    G&L Legacy Tribute
    1984 Ovation 1758 12 string
    2010 Guild F47R
    2013 Guild NS X175-B
    1998 Guild Starfire IV
    2008 Prototype D55
    2016 Guild NS X175 Sunburst

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •