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Thread: Filthy 1973 Guild D25

  1. #1
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    Filthy 1973 Guild D25

    Howdy!

    I've come across these forums numerous times while searching for Guild information,found it very useful and well, I have a bunch of questions so I thought I should sign up!

    To give just a little back story - I have a 2009 USA Martin 00-15 that I bought after auditioning a lot of guitars which replaced a 2004 USA Martin 000x1 and before that a Taylor Big Baby I had previously. I thought the Martin sounded more warm and musical, as opposed to the Taylor sounding metallic and tinny if I'm being honest. I love the Martin but wanted a vintage/beater for the living room so I bought a 1971 (Made in Kalamazoo MI) Epiphone, it sounded decent however I quickly realized the neck was lifting and within a month was unplayable so I cut my losses and sold it. That's when I found these forums and went in search for a Guild. I bought a Guild m120 Mahogany which while stunning looking, felt cheap and sounded a step above a toy... apologies if I offend anyone. So again I turned around and sold.

    I'm buying all these guitars used as I don't mind a few players nicks n bumps, I feel it adds character and generally with the older guitars I can buy American. That's when I came across the 1973 USA Guild D25 ... with a big hole in the side, nicks out of the headstock, repaired neck, drill holes in the bridge, scratches all over, chips, varnish build up, dust, dirt you name it, it had it. I took a gamble and at $300 I bought it. It arrived in a thin beat-up Dean box which I quickly un-packaged to make sure there was no further damage.

    I've had the Guild D25 a little over a week and can easily say it's the best guitar I have ever played. It makes my Martin sound boxy and, well, a bit dead.

    So here's the real question... Do I clean it? - I lightly dusted the inside and got clumps of dust and balls of hair (yuck!) as well as bits of wood from the damage. I started to give the body a light wipe with just water and a cloth and it's just moving the waxy(?) substance around and leaving nasty swirl marks on the body. I have a lemon oil for the fret board but I'm unsure how aggressive I can get with the body.

    ...would you clean it or leave it?

    Cheers guys n gals!











  2. #2
    Super Moderator Default's Avatar
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    Lighter fluid(naphtha) and a clean soft cloth.

    Removes the gunk and doesn't harm the finish!
    "Steve, you are a man of many goats."~ capnjuan
    "8 of 18", "19 of 22", "25 of 25"

    "Alternatively, you could just go the ultra-relic route with it. Basically go for a look that says the amp was on fire and they put it out using belt sanders. "

  3. #3
    That's a beautiful mahogany top on that guitar. I'm glad it "fits the bill" and that you enjoy playing it! There are quite a few fans of "Hog" top guitars around here. I can't add any thing about cleaning the guitar... but, welcome to LTG!

    Are you located State-side or in England/Europe?

    Bill
    "Fear God & Dread Nought"
    Sir John Fisher (1841-1920)
    Admiral of the Fleet, British Royal Navy

    1959 CE-100 D (Franz pickups, Bigsby B-6)
    1960 T-100 D (DeArmond pickups)
    1977 Mark II
    1981 D-25 NT

    1949 Gibson L-50
    1949 Gibson LG-1
    1956 Martin D-28
    1959 Gretsch 6124 (FilterTron pickup)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Default View Post
    Lighter fluid(naphtha) and a clean soft cloth.

    Removes the gunk and doesn't harm the finish!
    That sounds very aggressive but I'm sure you know what you're talking about... considering the back is chipping and the (varnish?) build up on the neck is substantial it would still be okay?


    Quote Originally Posted by sailingshoes72 View Post
    That's a beautiful mahogany top on that guitar. I'm glad it "fits the bill" and that you enjoy playing it! There are quite a few fans of "Hog" top guitars around here. I can't add any thing about cleaning the guitar... but, welcome to LTG!

    Are you located State-side or in England/Europe?

    Bill
    Thank you, yeah I am enjoying it for sure! I have another mahogany guitar but it doesn't sound anything like this... I'm really not sure why? Perhaps the age? The second hole? Haha!

    I am British living in Florida for over 15-years... hence the howdy/cheers dialect!

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Default's Avatar
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    It won't hurt the wood or the lacquer. I have used it on several of my guitars, old and new, and it works beautifully!
    "Steve, you are a man of many goats."~ capnjuan
    "8 of 18", "19 of 22", "25 of 25"

    "Alternatively, you could just go the ultra-relic route with it. Basically go for a look that says the amp was on fire and they put it out using belt sanders. "

  6. #6
    Welcome to world of (Westerly) Guilds!

    The marred finish on the back is relatively inconsequential - it is there to protect the wood from getting damaged (and it appears yours would have been severely damaged without a finish to protect it).

    Regarding the "waxy" substance you have encountered...All sorts of yuck, grime and gunk can accumulate on a guitar over the years and, as Default pointed out, Naptha can typically safely remove (most of) them. Your guitar originally started out with a Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish and, while it is not resistant to all solvents, Naptha will not harm it. Next to fire, perhaps, sweat can be NCL's greatest enemy. You may be dealing with a finish that has been subjected to some sufficient combination sweat, body chemistry, cleaners, oils and acids and ... to turn an otherwise impervious, impenetrable substance into a sticky, slimy mess. I had just such an instrument and I eventually refinished it, as no amount of cleaning could remove the goo.

    Give it a good cleaning a see what happens.

    The holes in the bridge can be filled, they are non-issues (so long as no crack appears between them).

    You gambled and won, in my view. Congratulations! Play it proudly.

  7. #7
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    I used naptha on my "snotless" D25 (it was really filthy) and followed it up with 3M Anti-Swirl polish using a small 4 or 4.5 inch foam pad on my electric drill. You have to be careful, but it turned out great. The naptha left a cloudy look to the finish. The polish is a very fine polish, not a rubbing compound. Then you have to get all the polish out of the cracks and dings. I used an automotive detail brush for that. Needless to say, that guitar has lots of mojo!
    Milt

    Almost enough Guilds

  8. #8
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graphicism View Post
    I'm buying all these guitars used as I don't mind a few players nicks n bumps, I feel it adds character and generally with the older guitars I can buy American. That's when I came across the 1973 USA Guild D25 ... with a big hole in the side, nicks out of the headstock, repaired neck, drill holes in the bridge, scratches all over, chips, varnish build up, dust, dirt you name it, it had it. I took a gamble and at $300 I bought it. It arrived in a thin beat-up Dean box which I quickly un-packaged to make sure there was no further damage.

    I've had the Guild D25 a little over a week and can easily say it's the best guitar I have ever played.

    It makes my Martin sound boxy and, well, a bit dead.
    Welcome aboard "Graph", I gotta say the last part made me laugh out loud.
    A Beat-to-S--t D25's the best guitar you ever played and shames your Martin.
    Figures.

    A little mojo goes a long way, eh?
    OK, in fairness, the Martin might benefit from a few more years of, er, experience.
    How much playing time does it have/get?


    Quote Originally Posted by Graphicism View Post
    So here's the real question... Do I clean it? - I lightly dusted the inside and got clumps of dust and balls of hair (yuck!) as well as bits of wood from the damage.
    Dude, it's too late, You shoulda called us before you took the dust and hairballs out of it.
    Hopefully you saved 'em and can put 'em back in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Cozad View Post
    Regarding the "waxy" substance you have encountered...All sorts of yuck, grime and gunk can accumulate on a guitar over the years and


    This must be the guitar KostasK was thinking of over in the "Linseed Oil" thread, when he said somebody could treat their fretboard with used motor oil for all he cared. (Since it was their guitar.)


    Ok, yeah, I'd definitely naptha that stuff off..if it hasn't dissolved and blended into the NCL already, it will sooner or later, looks like 40 years worth of pure toe (thumb?) jam...
    Can only imagine what the fretboard looks like....
    Al
    "Time May Change the Technique of Music But Never Its Mission " - Rachmaninoff
    My 1st Guild: '96 Westerly D25NT "Hally" (10-31-96 stamped on heelblock)
    #2: '01 Westerly F65ce "Blondie"
    #3: '03 Corona D40e Richie Havens "Richie"
    All bought new!

  9. #9
    A flatback D25, very nice!
    Wood

    1971 D25 Br flatback
    2008 Santa Cruz D/PWM
    Early 70s Martin 000-18

    "Attack transient is now way rounder".

  10. #10
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    Shades of Gloppy, but not nearly as decrepit.

    That guitar should clean up nicely with some naphtha. And whatever remains is OK. Because I KNOW what it sounds like!

    AFAIAC, once the headstock is broken and repaired, it is a "player" for ever more. And that is a beautiful thing!
    Neal

    '53 "X-150" Redburst
    '54 X-50 SB
    '54 X-200-S SB
    '71 F-20 ("Tonya")
    '71 D-25 BR
    '73 D-35
    '81 D-212 SB
    '12 F-50 STD SB
    '13 F-47R



    Others: '59 Gretsch Clipper, '74 Dobro Round-Neck Resonator, '87 Dobro Square-Neck Resonator, '09 Huss and Dalton TD-M Custom dreadnought, '11 Huss and Dalton 12-fret 000 Rosewood, Tele Partscaster.

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