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  1. Guild dreadnaught bracing patterns: 1971-1995

    I purchased my first Guild, a 1972 D-35, in January 1973 ( a story that I have retold several times on LTG, and will save retelling again for another day). Sometime around 1986, I purchased a second D-35 (from 1978), for Anne. I immediately noticed that the two guitars, tho the same model built just 6 years apart, differed significantly in weight: the 1978 D-35 (subsequently weighed in at ~5.5 lbs) was notably heavier than my 72, which is my lightest Guild, at just 4# 4oz...

    Altho my interest was piqued, investigation of the weight difference lanquished for more than 20 years. Then, in the summer of 2006, two "life changing" events happened: (1) I found "Lets Talk Guild, " and (2) I bought two more Guilds dreads from eBay auctions: a 74 G-37 Bld with arched maple back (top dated Apr 1974) , and a 74 D-25M with arched mahogany back (top dated Aug 1974). Built just a few months apart in 1974, I initially thought I would audition them, choose the one I liked, and resell the ...
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  2. Guild Dreadnaught Models: 1963~2000 (Hoboken, Westerly, and a little more)...

    Frono suggested that I post my list of dread models as a "Blog," so that they would be more accessible to other LTGers, without having to search through the entire LTG archives... so here it is! In future installments, perhaps I'll add my summary of Guild dread bracing, and more about my foray into Guild tone woods...

    I started compiling this list shortly after joining LTG in the summer of 2006, when I began my quest to sample dreads in all of the different tone woods used by Guild. At the time, I needed a list of dread models with basic specs such as top, back, and side woods and back construction (braced flat or unbraced arched). My info was gleaned from Hans Moust’s "The Guild Guitar Book The Company and The Instruments, 1952-1977," Beesley’s "Guitar History Volume #5 Guild Guitars," Guild serial number lists, and numerous discussions on LTG regarding dread models... particularly contributions from Hans. I do not consider the list to be a complete and comprehensive ...
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  3. Body Shape

    The body shape remained unchanged with two exceptions. The 90's reissues had the same shape but were thinner (top to bottom) and the GSR shape was significantly different in dimensions and proportions. Because of the changes in the headstock and tuners the bass has to be matched to the case. For example a '67 will fit in a 70's case and a Newark Street case but the Newark Street will not fit in the 70's case.

    Updated 10-21-2015 at 11:50 AM by fronobulax (Case comment)

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  4. Thumb and Finger rests

    SF II's did not come with thumb and/or finger rests. Thus any SF II that has them was either a conversion from a SF I or a post-factory modification.

    The earliest basses had the rests evenly spaced between the sweet spot pickup and the neck ("original"). They remained in the same location after the pickup moved to the neck position and then finally migrated to an offset location. All three configurations occurred during the Early era (an approximately in that chronology). The offset position occurred in the Vintage and 70's era. The original configuration is also observed in the GSR and Newark Street eras.

    Updated 11-27-2013 at 05:30 PM by fronobulax

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  5. Pickups - type

    The earliest of the Early era saw three different pickups, commonly called the "Mickey Mouse", the "other Hagstrom" and the Hagstrom "Bisonic". There is no clear data indicating which pickups were used when. The Bisonic was used at the latter part of the Early era and in the Vintage era. A Guild humbucker was used in the 70's. The 90's reissue had a pickup that was similar in cosmetic appearance to the Guild humbucker and it is most likely to have been made by Duncan to specs based on the 70's pickups. The GSR pickups are cosmetically like the Guild humbuckers and it has been stated that they are original "vintage" pickups, presumably the 70's version. The Newark Street has a new pickup designed to recreate the Bisonic both cosmetically and sonically.

    One way to distinguish between the '70's and '90's humbuckers is to remove the pickup and look at the back. The pole pieces protrude from the back plate in the '90's pickups but not the '70's.

    There have been ...

    Updated 11-18-2015 at 05:59 PM by fronobulax (Distinguish '70's and '90's)

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